20th Century

Visualising the Journeys of Irish Women who Married U.S. Navymen in World War One

We recently published the images and short biographies of 99 Irish women who applied for U.S. passports, based on either their marriage to a U.S. serviceman or their own services in support of the American military-effort during the First World War (see here). The data we collected offers us many potential insights, and we intend to use it to explore a number of different themes. In this post we have taken some of the data specifically relating to local women who married U.S. Naval personnel, and used it to visually map where they were from, and where they intended to make their new lives.

We identified 73 Irish women in the Passport applications who married U.S. Naval personnel serving in Ireland and Great Britain during the First World War. It should be noted that the vast bulk of these women had never been outside of Ireland prior to their marriage, and their intention to travel to the United States represented the first prospect of foreign travel for most of them. Up to 8,000 U.S. sailors served in or around Ireland at one time or another during the Great War, and it is no surprise that many struck up local romances. These liaisons with local women were often not welcomed by the local population, and occasionally led to violent clashes, particularly in Cork and Queenstown (Cobh) where the majority of bluejackets were based. The research of Dr. John Borgonovo of U.C.C. has shed considerable light on the often intense level of ill-feeling this created, and it will be something we explore further in a later post. Before looking specifically at the visualisations, it is worth remembering that in almost every case the women who married these sailors were very young. The graph below demonstrates this. Of the 73 women, only three were over the age of 30. The vast majority (64, or 90.9%) were aged between 17 and 25.

Age of U.S. Passport Applicants (Damian Shiels)

Age of Irish women who had married U.S. Naval personnel at the time of their U.S. Passport Applicants (Damian Shiels)

In order to visualise the data we have turned to Palladio, a web-based platform developed by the Humanities & Design Research Lab at the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis, Stanford University. Palladio was developed for the visualisation of complex, multi-dimensional data. It is free to use– all that is required is having the information in tabular format to upload and the time to prepare it appropriately. For that purpose we decided to spatially explore two elements of the data– where the Irish women who married these U.S. Naval personnel were born, and where they intended to travel to in the United States.

The different locations where Irish women who married U.S. Naval personnel as a result of the First World War were born (Damian Shiels/Palladio)

The different locations where Irish women who married U.S. Naval personnel as a result of the First World War were born- Click image to enlarge (Damian Shiels/Palladio)

The first map above presents each of the locations where Irish women who married U.S. Naval personnel were born. One of the most significant aspects of this is that women from every location where the Americans were based during the war are represented, including Queenstown (Cobh), Aghada, Passage West, Haulbowline, Bantry Bay, Wexford, Donegal and Dublin. The next map indicates the relative concentrations of women in these birthplaces, with 1 being the lowest and 18 the highest.

The relative concentrations of women who married U.S. Naval personnel by birthplace (Damian Shiels/Palladio)

The relative concentrations of women who married U.S. Naval personnel by birthplace- Click image to enlarge (Damian Shiels/Palladio)

Unsurprisingly Dublin offers one of the main concentrations, but by far and away the most heavily represented area is Co. Cork, a result of the fact that the bulk of U.S. servicemen were based there during the war, particularly around Cork Harbour. Of the 73 women identified, 50 were from Co. Cork. That concentration warrants a closer look.

The relative concentrations

The relative concentrations of women who married U.S. Naval personnel by birthplace, focus on Co. Cork- Click image to enlarge (Damian Shiels/Palladio)

A focus on Co. Cork shows that Cork City dominates with 18, followed by Queenstown (Cobh) with 13 and then Youghal with 4. The majority of the other Cork women came from the east of the county, with outliers in locations such as Bantry, likely associated with the U.S. Naval presence in Bantry Bay and on Whiddy Island.

Each of these Irish women took had decided not only to the marry an American, but also to leave all they had known behind for the United States. Though there is some evidence to suggest that not all of them would ultimately travel across the Atlantic, the majority of them undoubtedly did. We turn now to the other side of the Atlantic, to see where they hoped to end up.

USA location only

The locations in the United States where the Irish women intended to make their initial home following their departure- Click image to enlarge (Damian Shiels/Palladio)

As is evident in the visualisation above, these Irish women were spread across the length and breadth of the United States, particularly in the east and mid-west. The map below illustrates their relative concentrations.

concentration

The locations of densest concentration for the Irish wives of U.S. Naval personnel departing for the United States- Click image to enlarge (Damian Shiels/Palladio)

There is a notable concentration on the east coast, particularly in New York and in states such as Massachusetts and Pennsylvania, while some went initially to centres of the U.S. Navy where their husbands were based.

The final sets of visualisations are perhaps the most poignant. In them the data of the Irish women’s birthplaces and intended destinations are linked, showing how far from home they were travelling. They were journeying into the unknown, to meet up with husbands with whom they had at best spent only a few months, and often to locations where it is doubtful they knew a soul. There is also little doubt that for some, their decision to marry an American serviceman had met with the disapproval of, and potential estrangement from, their family in Ireland, another aspect we will return to in a later post.

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The intended destinations of the Irish women relative to their place of birth in Ireland- Click image to enlarge (Damian Shiels/Palladio)

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The intended destinations of the Irish women relative to their place of birth in Ireland, with relative concentration illustrated- Click image to enlarge (Damian Shiels/Palladio)

We will continue to analyse the data we retrieved relating to these Irish women in future posts. To view the data upon which these visualisations were based, you can view the original post here.

References

Palladio at Stanford

Categories: 20th Century | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Video: Aghada’s World War One U.S. Naval Air Station

As part of our ongoing U.S. Military in Cork Centenary Projecton Saturday we filmed a short video taking a look at the archaeology and history of the United States Naval Air Station in Aghada, Co. Cork. The video also touches on the economic and social impact of the base. You can watch the video below, we hope you enjoy it!

 

Categories: 20th Century, World War One | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

100 of Ireland’s World War One American Women in Pictures: Part 1– The Database

Over recent months the Midleton Archaeology & Heritage Project has been engaged in its largest undertaking to date. By systematically assessing United States passport applications from the end of World War One, we have been exploring some of the stories of Irish women who married U.S. servicemen based in Ireland during the conflict. In Part 1 of a series of posts, which will include both analytical discussion and mapping, we present our initial all-island database, which provides biographical details– and photographs– of almost 100 Irish women who were married to American servicemen, the vast bulk of them in Ireland. Passport Women Cover

2017 will mark the 100th anniversary of the arrival of American troops in Ireland to partake in World War One. The American military presence here is one of the least familiar stories from the period. Of the thousands who arrived, the majority were naval servicemen. The greater number were attached to the U.S. vessels operating out of Cork Harbour, but many were also stationed around the country, such as those at the United States Naval Air Service bases in Cork, Wexford, Dublin and Lough Foyle. The arrival of large numbers of foreign men from across the Atlantic had a major impact on the social environments where they were quartered. Many romances blossomed with local women, a form of interaction that was not always welcomed by the local community, most notably in Cork. For some, either out of love or necessity, marriage followed. Trying to ascertain detail on some of these Irish women’s individual stories is challenging. In an attempt to do so, we have trawled through thousands of  passport applications to identify those made by Irish women who had married American servicemen and were seeking to enter the United States.

In order to compile the database below, we carried out a detailed programme of analysis based around the United States passport applications held in the National Archives and Record Administration (NARA) in Washington, D.C. Using the http://www.ancestry.com U.S. passport application database as a starting point, we sought to identify all passports relating to Irish-born women born between 1885 and 1895 who made applications in 1917, 1918 and 1919. These included women recorded in passport sets such as the Passport Applications, January 2, 1906- March 31, 1925; Emergency Passport Applications, Argentina thru Venezuela, 1906-1925; and Applications of Wives of Members of the AEF in Europe. In addition we also searched for Irish women in Applications of Wives of Members of the AEF in Europe for 1920 and 1921. Of the thousands of results, we then examined the original passport scans of each, in order to extract those women with a direct connection to an American serviceman. Where we identified a relevant passport, we transcribed the information into a narrative paragraph, and saved an image of the passport photograph. In order to reveal the maiden names of as many of the Irish women as we could, we cross-referenced the majority with the Irish Marriages database on http://www.findmypast.ie, and also examined a number of World War One related records of U.S. military personnel. The results of this extensive project can be explored in the database of names below.

The women we identified have been separated into three categories, and within each they are divided by county of origin. The first two are those for the wives of U.S. Naval personnel and the wives of U.S. Army personnel, the bulk of which are applications made through consuls in Ireland and Britain by Irish women who had never been outside of Ireland but were seeking to travel to America. A small number also relate to Irish women who were married to an Irish emigrant who had entered United States service. A third category includes those Irish women in America who were seeking to perform service or to reside in France during the conflict (the latter is undoubtedly far from comprehensive). In the majority of instances only those passports where there was a confirmed military connection were included. Though it is likely we have identified many (if not most) of the applications of Irish women who married U.S. servicemen in Ireland or Britain during the conflict, there are undoubtedly more out there.

This post is the first in a series relating to these women, and is intended to present our initial database of individuals and something of their details. We will be seeking to map this information, and follow-on posts will examine what we can learn from them– just as some appear to be heartwarming stories of love, others hint at sadness and separation. We are eager to tell something of their stories, and to imagine what it must have been like for so many of them to leave all they knew behind as they set off for new lives across the Atlantic. Surely though the most compelling aspect of the compilation is the images of the women themselves. In these often haunting pictures we see a range not only of expressions and emotions, but also of hairstyles, fashion-sense and photographic settings. Some of the shots include their children, while one even includes the family dog. We hope you enjoy the information below, and we are eager to hear from readers who may be able add names or detail to this list.

The Wives of United States Navy by County

Co. Cork

Kathleen Yeager, 23, Greenmount, Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Dublin Consulate. Passport issued 7th July 1919.

Kathleen Dorney was born in Greenmount on 5th October 1895 to Thomas Dorney of Crosshaven and Kathleen (Crowley) Dorney of “Kilbuthry” (Kilbarry?), Co. Cork. She had lived in Cork all her life. On 11th February 1919 she had married Jasper Weeks Yeager, a native of Mississippi and a Chief Commissary Steward in the U.S. Navy at the Church of St. Finbar’s West in Cork. He had entered the service in St. Louis, Missouri on 5th April 1913. At the time of her application Jasper was living at 23 Upper Mount Street in Dublin, and was attached the U.S. depot on Sir John Rogerson’s Quay in the city. On emigration Kathleen intended to make her home at No. 1 West 129th Street in New York; she intended to sail on the SS Harrisburg on 10th July 1919.

Kathleen Yeager (NARA)

Kathleen Yeager (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret Butcher, 22, Queenstown, Co. Cork. Husband in U.S. Navy. Plymouth Consulate. Passport issued 3rd May 1920.

Margaret Reynolds was born in Queenstown on 8th March 1898 to William Reynolds of Kinsale and Minnie (Power) Reynolds of Queenstown. On 12th March 1919 in Plymouth she married Marion Butcher, a native of Boston, Massachusetts, who was a Coxswain in the U.S.N.R.F. Margaret had moved to Plymouth when a baby in 1898, living there ever since. Marion had served in the Navy from 17th July 1917 to 14th July 1919. His discharge was apparently due to his “inability to support wife on naval pay.” At the time of Margaret’s application Marion was living at 151 Commonwealth Avenue in Boston, where she hoped to join him, sailing in May.

Margaret Butcher (NARA)

Margaret Butcher (NARA/Ancestry)

Elizabeth Mary Morrison, 22, Cork, Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 7th June 1918.

Elizabeth Mary Jones had been born in Cork on 9th October 1895. On 16th February 1918 she had married Stephen C. Morrison in Cork; he was an Electrician First Class in the U.S. Navy. Stephen had been born in Lenoir, Caldwell County, North Carolina. At the time of her application on 6th March 1918 she was “temporarily sojourning” at 3 Victoria Street on Military Road, and her husband had been transferred back to the United States. Elizabeth had never been to America, and her new home was to be in Eufola, North Carolina.

Elizabeth Mary Morrison (NARA/Ancestry)

Elizabeth Mary Morrison (NARA/Ancestry)

Kathleen Quinn, 19, Cork, Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 26th July 1918.

Kathleen Hoskins was born in Cork on 7th March 1899. On 31st December 1917 she had married Chief Boatswain’s Mate James H. Quinn at the Church of S. S. Mary and Anne in Shandon, Cork. He had been born in Philadelphia and was serving in the U.S. Navy. Kathleen had never been to America before. She was going to live at 2905 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, and at the time of her application on 24th July 1918 was “temporarily sojourning” at 9 De Vesci Place, Monkstown, Co. Cork.

Kathleen Quinn (NARA/Ancestry)

Kathleen Quinn (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret Daisy Atkins, 19, Queenstown (Cobh), Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 30th April 1919.

Margaret Daisy Brierly was born in Queenstown on 14th August 1899. In the last quarter of 1918 she married Harold Atkins of Binnewater, New York while he was serving with the U.S. Navy; Harold was stationed in the U.S. Training Barracks in Passage. Margaret, who had never been outside of Ireland before, planned to live with her husband at 29 Staple Street in Kingston, New York.

Margaret Daisy Atkins (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret Daisy Atkins (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Ellen Balschi, 34, Cork City, Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 30th May 1919.

Mary Ellen O’Sullivan was born in Cork City on 13th July 1885. She had lived in Ireland all her life, and never been to the United States. She had married Thomas A. Balschi of Mount Carmel in Pennsylvania in the last quarter of 1917 while he was serving in the U.S. Navy. The couple planned to make their home in Catawissa, Pennsylvania.

Mary Ellen Balschi (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Ellen Balschi (NARA/Ancestry)

Letitia Becker, 22, Youghal, Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 4th June 1919.

Letitia Collins was born in Youghal on 21st July 1896, and had lived in Ireland all her life and had never been to the United States. Letitia married Joseph Leonard Becker, a member of the U.S. Navy. The date of their marriage is not given, though Letitia’s application to become an American citizen had been approved on 8th October 1918 and the Civil Registration index suggests they had married in the first three months of 1918. The couple’s son John Arthur was born in Youghal on 14th January 1919. The young family planned to live at 5 Ernst Street in Rochester, New York. The oath taken to confirm Letitia’s identity was taken by Ann Bingham, also from Youghal, who had known Letitia since childhood; Ann had also married a U.S. sailor.

Letitia Becker (NARA/Ancestry)

Letitia Becker (NARA/Ancestry)

Ann Bingham, 22, Youghal, Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 2nd June 1919.

Ann Cronin was born in Youghal on 4th September 1896. She had known Letitia Becker (above) for 20 years. She had lived in Ireland all her life and ever been to the United States. Ann had married U.S. Navy man Edward Ross Bingham, and the couple planned to make their home at 715 East Seminary Street in Danville, Illinois. Although the date of their marriage is not provided, Ann’s application to become an American citizen had been approved on 8th July 1918, and the Civil Registration index suggests they had married in the first three months of 1918. Their son John Patrick was born in Youghal on 24th December 1918. Letitia Becker took the oath to confirm Ann’s identity on the application.

Ann Bingham (NARA/Ancestry)

Ann Bingham (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Esther Blanton, 21, Cork City, Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 5th August 1919.

Mary was born in Cork on 23rd February 1898. Her maiden name was Blackshields; her father George was originally from Colchester in England, while her mother Catherine (née Donovan) was from Bandon. Mary had lived in Ireland from 1898 to 1901, then in England until 1908, before returning to Ireland. Mary had never been to the United States, but was now going because of her marriage to Carpenter’s Mate 1st Class Marion J. Blanton of the U.S. Navy. Marion had enlisted in Charleston, South Carolina on 2nd December 1915, and was serving aboard the USS Panther. The couple had married in St. Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown on 17th February 1918; their daughter Florence was born in the same town on 23rd December that year. The family planned to make their home in Charleston.

Mary Esther Blanston (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Esther Blanton (NARA/Ancestry)

Josephine Buckingham, 22, Queenstown, Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 28th February 1919.

Josephine Donovan was born in Queenstown on 14th December 1896. She had never been to the United States, and had never been outside of Ireland. She married Elbert Ray Buckingham of the U.S. Navy in St. Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown on an unspecified date in the last quarter of 1917. Elbert was a native of Pensacola, Florida, though the newlyweds intended to make their home at 506 Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn.

Josephine Buckingham (NARA/Ancestry)

Josephine Buckingham (NARA/Ancestry)

Gertrude Caruso, 18, Queenstown, Co. Cork, Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 20th June 1919.

Gertrude Clifford was born in Queenstown on 19th September 1900. Her father George was from Cork City, while her mother Mary (née Brown) was from Queenstown. She had lived in Ireland all her life, and had never been to America. She met and married James Caruso of Higginsville, New York at St. Colman’s Cathedral on 11th March 1919. He was then serving as a Fireman 1st Class on the USS Corsair. She planned to make her home at 730 Lansing Street in Utica, New York. 

Gertrude Caruso (NARA/Ancestry)

Gertrude Caruso (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Josephine Clark, 19, Youghal, Co. Cork, Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Application submitted 19th March 1919.

Mary Josephine Dea was born in Youghal on 14th March 1900. She met and married Eugene Henry Clark from Floyd County, Iowa; according to the register of Irish Marriages their wedding took place in the first three months of 1918. Their daughter Mary Josephine Gene Clark was born in Cork on 21st October 1918. Mary’s application does not state if her husband was in the armed forces, but it did state that he was dead. The answer may lie in the U.S. Navy Casualty Reports. It records the fate of a Gunner’s First Mate Eugene Henry Clark on 7th October 1918:

U.S.S. SHAW

At about 6:45 a.m. while attempting to secure after bill board which was torn loose by the seas, the following man was washed overboard. An extremely heavy sea was running and was sweeping the deck and bridge:-

CLARK, Eugene Henry  Gunner’s Mate 1c

It would seem almost certain that this was Mary’s husband, given that the USS Shaw‘s home port was Queenstown. Mary stated that she had lived in Ireland all her life, and that she planned to live at 110 Linden Avenue in Waterloo, Iowa.

Mary Josephine Clark (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Josephine Clark (NARA/Ancestry)

Catherine Friend, 20, Cork City, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 28th February 1919.

Catherine McCarthy was born in Margaret Street, Cork City on 30th October 1898. She had lived in Ireland all her life, and had never been in the United States. She married George F. Friend of New York, who was then serving in the U.S. Navy in the last quarter of 1917. They planned to make their home at 52 Morris Street in New Jersey.

Catherine Friend (NARA/Ancestry)

Catherine Friend (NARA/Ancestry)

Norah Fry, 22, Blackrock, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 30th April 1919.

Norah Mehegan was born in Blackrock on 27th January 1897. She had never been to the United States, and had lived in Ireland all her life. She married American Ralph Henry Fry who was serving in the U.S. Navy in the last quarter of 1918. Norah planned to make her home at 287 East 136th Street in New York.

Norah Fry (NARA/Ancestry)

Norah Fry (NARA/Ancestry)

Nellie Fuller, 21, Cork City. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 17th June 1919.

Nellie Crowley was born in Cork on 8th March 1898. She had lived in Ireland all her life. She married U.S. Navy man Alton Howard Fuller of Boston, Massachusetts at the Roman Catholic Church in Monkstown, Co. Cork on 19th April 1919. Their new home was to be Livermore Falls in Maine.

Nellie Fuller (NARA/Ancestry)

Nellie Fuller (NARA/Ancestry)

Veronica Harris, 21, Castlemartyr, Co. Cork. Husband in U.S. Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 7th August 1919.

Veronica Dillon was born in Castlemartyr on 3rd February 1898 to Thomas Dillon (a native of Monaghan) and Norah Dillon (née Ryan, from Tipperary). Veronica, who had never been in the United States, married New Yorker Francis Cody Harris in Aghada, Co. Cork on 8th April 1918. Francis was then serving as a Chief Electrician aboard the Receiving Ship New York. He had entered the service in San Francisco in 1906. By the time of her application Francis was back in the United States; Veronica hoped to join her husband in Brooklyn via the SS Plattsburg on 15th August 1919.

Veronica Harris (NARA/Ancestry)

Veronica Harris (NARA/Ancestry)

Kathleen Hawk, 22, Passage West, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 21st July 1919.

Kathleen Collins was born in Passage West on 18th July 1896 to James Collins and Mary (Harding) Collins, both also of Passage West. In the Church of St. Marys, Passage West on 16th January 1919 she married Ray Clifton Hawk, a Chief Boatswain’s Mate aboard the USS Imperator. Ray had been in the service since 1910. On arrival in the United States she intended to make her home at 1021 West Jacks St., St. Kokomo, Indiana.

Kathleen Hawk (NARA/Ancestry)

Kathleen Hawk (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret Kowalski, 20, Midleton. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport Issued 3rd September 1919

Margaret had been born in Midleton on 12th September 1899 and had lived in Ireland “all my life” and had “never been in U.S.” She applied to the U.S. Consulate in Queenstown for a passport, as she had married Wenceslaus Kowalski of the United States Navy in Midleton on 15th March 1919. He was a native of Milwaukee, Wisconsin where he lived at 914 11th Avenue. By the time Margaret applied, Wenceslaus had been moved on to Liverpool.

Margaret Kowalski (Ancestry)

Margaret Kowalski (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Josephine Horn, 17, Queenstown, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 29th August 1919.

Mary Josephine Donovan was born in Queenstown on 23rd February 1902 to Eugene Donovan of Queenstown and Mary (Keating) Donovan of Cork. She had lived in Ireland all her life and never been to the United States. On 13th April 1919 she married Chief Quartermaster Irwin Robert Horn of the USS Corsair in St. Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown. Irwin had been born in Reading, Pennsylvania on 4th May 1897. Her husband having already returned to America, Mary Josephine intended to join him there at 13 North 13th Street in Newark, New Jersey. She hoped to sail on the SS President Grant on 3rd September.

Mary Josephine Horn (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Josephine Horn (NARA/Ancestry)

Violet Mary Hynes, 20, Haulbowline, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 29th January 1919.

Violet Mary Irwin was born in Haulbowline on 13th December 1897. Her husband Thomas Nicholas Hynes had been born in St. John’s, Newfoundland in May 1895, and that November the family had emigrated to Summerville, Massachusetts. In 1918 he had joined the U.S. Navy at Boston and was assigned to the Naval Air Station in Aghada, Co. Cork. The couple were married in St. Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown on 13th November 1918. Violet was making her temporary home at Lakeview, Carrignafoy in Queenstown while she awaited news on her application, which was complicated by the fact that her husband was not a naturalized U.S. citizen.

Violet Mary Hynes (NARA/Ancestry)

Violet Mary Hynes (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret Lapenta, 24, Cork City. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 7th August 1919.

Margaret Ring was born in Cork on 7th April 1895. On 13th April 1919 she married Anthony Elia Lapenta (Carmine Antonio Lapenta) of the U.S. Navy at St. Mary’s of Mount Carmel in Harwich, Essex, England. Anthony had been born in New York on 1st March 1890. Margaret applied from Cork, and intended to live at 126 North Elliot Place in Brooklyn, having never been to the United States before.

Margaret Lapenta (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret Lapenta (NARA/Ancestry)

Elizabeth Johns, 19, Cork City. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 18th July 1919.

Elizabeth O’Regan was born in Cork on 10th November 1899. She had never been outside Ireland before. She married U.S. Navy man John Johns in St. Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown on 19th February 1919. John had been born in Scot Haven, Westmoreland, Pennsylvania in 1893 and had spent his life in Homestead, Pennsylvania. The couple’s son John T. Johns was born in Cork on 24th November 1918. When Elizabeth went to the United States she planned to live in Boston.

Elizabeth Johns (NARA/Ancestry)

Elizabeth Johns (NARA/Ancestry)

Hannah Luckett, 23, Castlelyons, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 24th February 1919.

Hannah Noonan was born in Castlelyons on 3rd October 1895. She married Charles R. Luckett of the U.S. Navy at St. Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown on 6th April 1918. She had never been to the United States, and had lived in Ireland all her life. Hannah intended to make her home at 516 Fifth Street, S.E., Washington D.C.

Hannah Luckett (NARA/Ancestry)

Hannah Luckett (NARA/Ancestry)

Bridget Mary Mahony, 22, Midleton, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 9th May 1919.

Bridget Mary Lynch was born in Midleton on 7th May 1897 to Thomas Lynch and Mary (Geary) Lynch, both also of Midleton. She had lived in Ireland all her life and never been to the United States. On 1st January 1919 she married George Daniel Mahony in St. Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown– he was a Cook aboard the USS Imperator. George had been born in the U.S. and had enlisted in 1915; Bridget intended to make her home with him in New York City.

Bridget Mary Mahony (Ancestry)

Bridget Mary Mahony (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Josephine Moore, 23, Youghal, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 31st May 1919.

Mary Josephine Doran was born in Youghal on 15th February 1896 to William Doran of Killeagh and Mary (Broderick) Doran of Youghal. She had never been to the United States and had lived in Ireland all her life. On 11th October 1917 she married William Thompson Moore, a Coxswain in the U.S. Navy at St. Colman’s Cathedral in Queenstown. He had entered service at Great Lakes on 11th February 1916 and at the time of Mary’s application was still in the Navy, at New York. Their son John William Moore was born in Queenstown on 14th January 1919. Mary hoped to sail with her son around 15th June 1919, and intended to make her home at 925 Chicago Avenue in Evanston, Illinois.

Mary Josephine Moore (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Josephine Moore (NARA/Ancestry)

Euphrosyne Posey, 26, Queenstown, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 23rd June 1919.

Euphrosyne Cain was born in Queenstown on 20th May 1893. In the middle of the 1918 she married William Alton Posey, a native of Shreveport, Louisiana and a member of the U.S. Navy. Euphrosyne had never been in the United States, and never been outside of Ireland. The couple planned to make their home in Birmingham, Alabama.

Euphrosyne Posey (NARA/Ancestry)

Euphrosyne Posey (NARA/Ancestry)

Alice Maud Pranis, 22, Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 2nd June 1919.

Alice Maud Pain was born in Cork on 12th July 1896. She married Joseph Pranis from Cleveland, Ohio, in Cork during the last quarter of 1917. Joseph, from Cleveland, Ohio, was serving in the U.S. Navy. Alice had lived in Ireland all her life and never been to the United States. On 17th October 1918 the couple celebrated the birth of their son Joseph Arthur Pranis in Cork. Cissie Pain, a relative of Alice who swore to her identification lived at 5 Langford Terrace in Cork.

Alice Maud Pranis (NARA/Ancestry)

Alice Maud Pranis (NARA/Ancestry)

Hanora Riffle, 22, Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 2nd June 1919.

Hanora Pearson was born in Cork on 29th November 1897. She married James Mathule Riffle of the United States Navy in Cork during the last quarter of 1918. Hanora had spent during her life in Ireland, India, Malta and England during her life, as her father was in the British Army. She had never been to the United States.

Hanora Riffle (NARA/Ancestry)

Hanora Riffle (NARA/Ancestry)

Helena Swann, 21, Carrigtwohill, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 25th August 1919.

Helena Cotter was born in Carrigtwohill on 1st January 1898 to Batholomew Cotter and Elizabeth (O’Brien) Cotter, both also of Carrigtwohill. She had lived in Ireland all her life and never been to the United States. On 22nd July 1918 she had married James Swann in the Church of St. Aloysius, Carrigtwohill, a native of Baltimore, Maryland and a 1st Class Baker aboard USS Melville. James had entered the service around 1914, was discharged in 1918, and at the time of Helena’s application was serving in the Mercantile Marine. She hoped to join her husband at 4 South Street in New York City, sailing on 5th September.

Helena Swann (NARA/Ancestry)

Helena Swann (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Thomas, 21, Cork City. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 4th April 1919.

Mary Murphy was born in Cork on 16th January 1897. On 10th February 1918 she married Robert Lee Thomas, a native of Manhattan, Kansas, in the Roman Catholic Church of S.S. Mary & Anne in Shandon, Cork City. Mary had lived in Ireland all her life and never been to the United States. The couple’s daughter Elsa Irene was born in Cork on 27th December 1918.

Mary Thomas (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Thomas (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret Thompson, 19, Cork City. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 5th June 1919.

Margaret was born in Cork on 14th July 1900. She married Forest Thompson, a native of Gainesville, Missouri in 1918. Forest was then serving in the U.S. Navy. Margaret had lived in Ireland all her life and never been to the United States. At the time of her application Forest was at Knottyash Camp in Liverpool. She intended her home to be Gainesville, Missouri R.F.D.#2 following emigration.

Margaret Thompson (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret Thompson (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Turner, 21, Kilworth, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 18th June 1919.

Mary O’Keefe was born in Kilworth on 26th February 1897. She had lived in Ireland all her life and had never been to the United States. In St. Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown on 20th October 1917 she had married Edward Chester Turner, a Fireman in the U.S. Navy and native of Meyers, California. Mary did not know where Edward had enlisted, and at the time of her application he had been discharged and was back in America. Mary hoped to make her home with him at 525 Main Street in Fitchburg, Massachusetts. She intended to sail on 8th July 1919 aboard the SS Plattsburg. 

Mary Turner (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Turner (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Turner, 23, Kilworth, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 19th October 1920 (See Above)

Mary O’Keeffe again applied for the passport, an indication that just because Irish women received one they did not always travel. In her second application she said her husband was discharged “recently in the U.S. I do not know when or where” and when asked her husband was she said “I do not know as I have not heard from him for twelve months.” Mary now intended to make her home at 130 Tildon Street, Lowell, Massachusetts and hoped to sail on 4th November 1920 on the SS Baltic. 

Mary Turner (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Turner (NARA/Ancestry)

Hannah Coakley Vassar, 33, Ballywilliam, Queenstown, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 4th April 1919.

Hannah Coakley was born in Ballywilliam on 31st December 1885. She had lived in Ireland all her life and never been to the United States. She married Addison Vassar, a native of Napoleon, Indiana and member of the U.S. Navy in Cork during the first quarter of 1918. Their son John Addison was born in Ballywilliam on 5th October 1918. Hannah intended to make her home at 124 West 13th Street in Bayonne, New Jersey.

Hannah Coakley Vassar (NARA/Ancestry)

Hannah Coakley Vassar (NARA/Ancestry)

Bridget Mary Wallace, 21, Queenstown, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 1st July 1919.

Bridget Mary Carroll was born in Queenstown on 6th May 1898 to Richard Carroll of Co. Kerry and Bridget (Sheedy) Carroll of Castle Oliver, Co. Limerick. She had lived in Ireland all her life and never been to the United States. On 22nd April 1919 she married Kenneth Rueben Wallace in St. Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown. Kenneth was a Lieutenant Commander in the U.S. Navy, having entered the service in Annapolis in 1909. Following her emigration she planned to make her home at 7000 Eggleston Avenue in Chicago, Illinois.

Bridget Mary Wallace (NARA/Ancestry)

Bridget Mary Wallace (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret Wells, 21, Aghada, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 21st January 1919.

Margaret Smyth was born in Aghada on 25th March 1897. She married Roy Augustus Wells, a native of Huron, South Dakota in the Roman Catholic Church in Aghada on 3rd November 1918. He was a Chief Quartermaster based at the U.S. Naval Air Station in Aghada. Margaret had never been to the United States before and had lived in Ireland all her life. She intended to make her home at R.R.#3, Hudson, Michigan.

Margaret Wells (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret Wells (NARA/Ancestry)

Norah White, 20, Cork City. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 10th April 1919.

Norah Hennessy was born in Cork on 17th March 1899. She had lived in Ireland all her life. She married Charles Samuel White, a native of Fairhaven, Massachusetts and member of the U.S. Navy in Cork in the second quarter of 1918. Norah intended to make her home at 61 Alvoid Avenue, Springfield, Massachusetts.

Norah White (NARA/Ancestry)

Norah White (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Kate Wilder, 22, Donoughmore, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 16th April 1919. 

Mary Kate Magill was born in Donoughmore on 8th May 1896. She had lived in Ireland all her life. On 22nd December 1918 she married Edwin Vernon Wilder, a native of Kansas and member of the U.S. Navy, in St. Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown. Edwin, who had been born in Osborne on 13th May 1889, was a Junior Grade Lieutenant at U.S.N.T. Barracks Base 6. Mary Kate planned to live in Osborne, Kansas.

Mary Kate Wilder (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Kate Wilder (NARA/Ancestry)

Madge Weed, 25, Cork City. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 17th March 1919.

Madge Linehan was born in Cork on 25th September 1894 to Thomas and Bridget Linehan of Cork. She had never been in the United States. She married Harry Alonzo Weed of Erie, Pennsylvania on 29th September 1917 in St. Patrick’s Church, Cork. He was then serving as a water-tender aboard USS Allen, having joined the service in 1899. At the time of Madge’s application Harry was back in New York. In the United States she intended to make her home on Route #5 in Waterford, Pennsylvania, and hoped to sail on 21st March 1919.

Madge Weed (NARA/Ancestry)

Madge Weed (NARA/Ancestry)

Ellen Woodson, 19, Cork City. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 25th February 1919.

Ellen Ring was born in Cork on 4th January 1900. She married Russell Micklem Woodson, a native of Rockfish, Nelson County, Virginia in St. Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown on 2nd June 1918, while Russell was serving in the U.S. Navy. Ellen had lived in Ireland all her life. Mary Cooney who provided her identification in Queenstown, had known her for only eight months.

Ellen Woodson (NARA/Ancestry)

Ellen Woodson (NARA/Ancestry)

Nellie Anderson, 23, Queenstown. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 2nd December 1920.

Nellie Burns was born in Queenstown in March 1897 to John Burns of Cork City and Hannah Burns of Queenstown. She married Charles D. Anderson, of Green County, Pennsylvania on 9th February 1918 in St. Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown. At the time Charles was serving as a Seaman in the U.S. Navy. He initially enlisted in August 1916, was discharged in August 1920 and had since rejoined. Charles had been born on 21st February 1896. The couple’s son Patrick was born in Queenstown a month after they were married, on 17th March 1918. Nellie had lived in Ireland all her life and never been to the United States. As part of her application Nellie produced a letter from her husband showing that he wished her to join him in America. At the time of her application her husband was in Mexico. Upon emigration Nellie intended to live at 115 Murton Avenue in Mountville, West Virginia. She hoped to sail on the SS Baltic on 9th December 1920.

Nellie Anderson (NARA/Ancestry)

Nellie Anderson (NARA/Ancestry)

Johanna Dealy, 19, Cork City. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 30th September 1920.

Johanna Twomey was born in Cork on 28th January 1901 to Patrick and Mary Frances Twomey of Cork. On 11th March 1918 she married Richard Edgar Dealy, of Boston, Massachusetts at the Church of S.S. Peter and Paul in Cork. Richard was then a Chief Machinist in the U.S. Navy, and he had been born on 7th April 1892. Their daughter Ellen was born in Cork on 18th February 1919. At the time of Johanna’s application Richard was still in the Navy, and was at Chelsea Street in Charlestown, Massachusetts. She had lived in Ireland all her life and never been to the United States. Johanna hoped to join her husband by sailing on 8th August from Antwerp.

Johanna Dealy (NARA/Ancestry)

Johanna Dealy (NARA/Ancestry)

Annie Wilkinson, 18, Queenstown, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 5th August 1920.

Annie Burke was born in Queenstown on 3rd July 1902 to John and Mary Ellen Burke of the town. She had lived in Ireland all her life and never been to the United States. On 5th April 1919 she married Ira Martin Wilkinson of Chillicothe, Ohio, in St. Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown. Ira was a U.S. Navy Cook, and was at the time of Annie’s application in the Navy Yard in Philadelphia. He had been born on 27th August 1894. Following her emigration Annie intended to live at 58 Warren Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts.

Annie Wilkinson (NARA/Ancestry)

Annie Wilkinson (NARA/Ancestry)

Katherine Odgers, 27, Queenstown, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 7th January 1921.

Katherine Hegarty was born in Queenstown on 26th April 1893 to Patrick and Mary Hegarty both of the town. On 29th December 1918 she married Harry Morton Odgers, a Chief Yeoman in the U.S. Navy in St. Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown. Katherine had lived in Ireland until 1916, before spending the following two years in England and returning to Ireland in 1918. She spent another five months in England between June and December 1920. At the time of her application Harry was on a receiving ship in New York. She didn’t know what her permanent address in the United States would be, but hoped to sail on 9th January 1921 aboard the SS St Mehiel.

Katherine Odgers (NARA/Ancestry)

Katherine Odgers (NARA/Ancestry)

Annie Frances Emery, 19, Passage West, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 26th May 1919.

Annie Frances Kennedy was born in Passage West on 8th August 1898. Her father Edward and Mary were also both Irish. Annie had lived in Ireland all her life, and had never been to the United States. On 8th May 1919 Annie married Eugene J. Emery in the Church of St. Mary in Passage West. Eugene was a Gunner in the U.S. Navy, and had enlisted in San Francisco, California in September 1903. At the time of her application, Eugene was in the Knotty Ash Rest Camp in Liverpool. Annie hoped to travel aboard the SS Plattsburg on 2nd June, with the intention of living in 238 Monteray Avenue in Ontario, California.

Annie Frances Emery (NARA/Ancestry)

Annie Frances Emery (NARA/Ancestry)

Elizabeth Janke, 21, Queenstown, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 23rd June 1919.

Elizabeth Hawkins was born in Queenstown on 24th August 1897 to William Hawkins and Annie (O’Halloran) Hawkins, both natives of the town. She had never been to the United States, but had lived in Plymouth, England from September 1909 to November 1914. Elizabeth married Seaman William Edward Janke on 20th November 1918 in St. Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown. William had entered the U.S. service some eight years previously. Elizabeth would make her home with him at 3518 Riverside Avenue in Cleveland, Ohio. She hoped to sail on the SS Plattsburg on 3rd July 1919.

Elizabeth Janke (NARA/Ancestry)

Elizabeth Janke (NARA/Ancestry)

Phillis Audrey Tarbutton, 19, Queenstown, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 9th August 1919.

Phillis Audrey Scogings was born in Queenstown on 29th November 1899 to Thomas William Scogings of Queenstown and Mary Elizabeth Scogings of Liverpool. She had lived in Ireland, England and Wales from her birth to 1919, and had never been to the United States. She had married William Edward Tarbutton, a native of Crumpton, Maryland on 12th July 1919 in Queenstown. William a Junior Grade Lieutenant aboard USS Greene, where he was still serving at the time of Phillis’s application. Phillis was staying at Rhianfa in Bull Bay, Anglesey, Wales when she applied. She hoped to stay in the Biltmore Hotel in New York after her emigration, intended to leave on the SS Plattsburg on 15th August 1919.

Phillis Audrey Tarbutton (NARA/Ancestry)

Phillis Audrey Tarbutton (NARA/Ancestry)

Bridie Comerford, 19, Bantry, Co. Cork. Husband in U.S. Navy. London Consulate. Passport issued 29th May 1919.

Bridie Sullivan was born in Bantry on 3rd June 1900. Her father Donald and mother Margaret were both also Irish. Bridie entered into a relationship with Walter Earl Comerford, a Chief Stoker aboard the USS Bushnell. She was already a number of months pregnant when they married in Forest Hill, London in December 1918; their son Robert was born in London on 20th March 1919. Bridie had never been to the United States before. At the time of her application Walter was already back in America, at Norfolk, Virginia. It was there that Bridie intended to make her home, at 735 West 35th Street. She hoped to sail on the SS Plattsburg on 2nd June 1919.

Bridie Comerford (NARA/Ancestry)

Bridie Comerford (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret Sullivan Roberson, 20, Bantry, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. London Consulate. Passport issued 11th November 1919.

Margaret Sullivan was born in Bantry on 14th July 1899 to Daniel Francis Sullivan of Bantry and Margaret Sullivan of Schull. She had never been to the United States. On 2nd August 1919 she married Robert Fulton Roberson, a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Robert was a Junior Grade Lieutenant in the United States Navy. A few months before their marriage they had celebrated the birth of a son, Dannie, who was born in Liverpool on 9th April 1919. Margaret and her son intended to make their home at 3155 Broadway in New York following emigration.

Margaret Sullivan Roberson (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret Sullivan Roberson (NARA/Ancestry)

Nora C. Shoen, 20, Queenstown, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Navy. London Consulate. Passport issued 28th May 1919.

Nora Coughlan was born in Queenstown on 4th August 1888 to John and Kate Coughlan. She had lived in Ireland all her life and never been to the United States. Nora married Zina Ray Shoen in Queenstown on 6th August 1918. At the time of Nora’s application Zina was in New York. She hoped to join him at 78 North Main Street, Messene, New York via the SS Harrisburg, sailing on 8th June 1919. Nora later sought a passport to return to Ireland which was granted on 4th April 1921. She was living in Norfolk, Virginia at the time, and sought to come back to Europe citing “ill health.” She hoped to leave from New York on the same date as her application.

Nora C Shoen (NARA/Ancestry)

Nora C Shoen (NARA/Ancestry)

Marguerite Joyce Ginns, 19, Cork City. Husband in United States Navy. Southampton Consulate. Passport issued 2nd June 1919.

Marguerite Joyce Callan was born in Cork on 13th November 1899 to Daniel and Mary Callan, both of that city. Marguerite married Michael J. Ginns of Pennsylvania in Queenstown on 12th December 1917, while he was a First Class Machinist on the USS Shaw. She had never been to the United States before. At the time of her application Michael was already on his way back to America. Marguerite, who at the time was living at 79 Malins Road in Southampton, hoped to sail aboard the SS Louisville on 15th June 1919 in order to join him in her new home at Roseville, California.

Joyce Ginns (NARA/Ancestry)

Joyce Ginns (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Donegal

Margaret Smith, 22, Iskaheen, Co. Donegal. Husband in United States Navy. Londonderry Consulate. Passport issued 14th October 1919.

Margaret Gallagher was born in Iskaheen on 18th January 1897 to James Gallagher of Killdrum, Co. Donegal and Rose Ann Mullan of Iskaheen. She had lived in Ireland all her life and never been to the United States. On 25th November 1918 she married Benjamin James Smith at the Roman Catholic Cathedral of St. Eugene in Londonderry.  A native of St. Louis, Missouri, Benjamin was then serving as an Ordinary Seaman in the United States Navy, and was a member of the United States Naval Air Station based on Lough Foyle. He had enlisted in St. Louis on 25th May 1917.On the 28th August 1919 the couple’s first child, Rose Ann, was born. At the time of Margaret’s application had been discharged and was living at 2555 Maiden Lane Street in St. Louis, where Margaret hoped to join him.

Margaret Smith (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret Smith (NARA/Ancestry)

Sarah Christina Stephens, 21, Castlecar, Moville, Co. Donegal. Husband in United States Navy. Londonderry Consulate. Passport issued 14th October 1919.

Sarah Christina McSheffrey was born in Castlecar on 27th March 1898 to James McSheffrey of Moville and Mary Doherty. She lad lived in Moville all her life and never been to the United States. On 25th December 1918 she had married Milton J. Stephens in the Roman Catholic Church of St. Columba in Drung, Co. Donegal. A native of St. Louis, Missouri, Milton was an Electrician 1st Class in the United States Navy, serving at the United States Naval Air Station base in Lough Foyle. He entered the service on 24th May 1917 in St. Louis, and was discharged on 7th August 1919. At the time of Sarah’s application Milton was back in St. Louis, where Sarah hoped to join him at 4036 Rabade? Avenue.

Sarah Christina Stephens (NARA/Ancestry)

Sarah Christina Stephens (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Josephine Gabis, 21, Shrove, Moville, Co. Donegal. Husband in United States Navy. Londonderry Consulate. Passport issued 20th January 1920.

Mary Josephine Richardson was born in Shrove on 6th July 1900 to Hugh Richardson of Londonderry and Marianne (Hegarty) Richardson of Shrove. She married Stephen Gabis of Schenectady, New York on 27th March 1919 in St. Columba’s Church, Long Tower, Londonderry. She had lived all her life in Ireland and never been to the United States. Stephen had served as a Seaman in the U.S. Navy from August 1917 to July 1919, had been based at the U.S. Naval Air Station in Lough Foyle, and was discharged on the cessation of hostilities. He was in Brooklyn, New York at the time of her application. Mary intended to join him there, at 77 Pacific Street in Brooklyn.

Mary Josephine Gabis (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Josephine Gabis (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Dublin

Lily Iris Sumner, 21, Dublin, Husband in United States Navy. Dublin Consulate. Passport issued 16th October 1918.

Lily Iris Bleakley was born in Dublin on 15th September 1897. She married Blancharde M. Sumner, a native of California in St. Stephen’s Church, Dublin in 1918. He was then serving aboard the USS Ophir. She had never lived in America, and took the Oath of Allegiance on 11th September 1918.

Lily Iris Sumner (NARA/Ancestry)

Lily Iris Sumner (NARA/Ancestry)

Josephine E. Buchno, 27, Dublin, Husband in United States Navy. Dublin Consulate. Passport issued 7th June 1919.

Josephine Cleary was born in Dublin on 1st July 1891. Her father James Cleary was also a Dublin native, while her mother Ellen (née Egan) was from Killarney, Co. Kerry. Josephine had never been outside Ireland before she met John Buchno, a native of Buffalo, New York. John was serving as a Boatswain’s Mate with the United States Naval Air Force at the United States Naval Air Shipping Station in Dublin. He had enlisted on 15th March 1917 in Buffalo. The couple married at St. Kevin’s Church in Dublin on 30th November 1918. When they arrived in America they planned to make their home at 15 Roebling Avenue in Buffalo.

Josephine Buchno (NARA/Ancestry)

Josephine Buchno (NARA/Ancestry)

Mabel Davis, 20, Dublin. Husband in United States Navy. Dublin Consulate. Passport issued 11th July 1919.

Mabel Dowzard was born in Dublin on 8th April 1899. Her father Edward had also been born in Dublin, while her mother Mary A. Cotterill Dowzard was from Stockport in England. She had lived in Ireland all her life, and had never been to America. Mabel met Paul W. Davis from Kennebunk, Maine, a Pharmacist’s Mate in the United States Navy, and married him at the North Strand Church in Dublin on 8th January 1919. Paul had enlisted at Chelsea, Massachusetts on 2nd April 1917 and at the time of Mabel’s application was in Liverpool awaiting embarkation to the United States. The couple hoped to make their home at 199 Auburn Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Mabel Davis (NARA/Ancestry)

Mabel Davis (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Skelly, 29, Dublin. Husband in United States Navy. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 20th November 1918.

Mary was born in Dublin on 19th November 1889. She married James Skelly at St. Michan’s in Dublin on 10th November 1915. Mary had lived in Dublin from her birth until November 1915, since which date she had resided in Liverpool. By the time of her application on 18th November 1918 James was a member of the U.S. Navy, serving aboard USS Leviathan. He had been born in New York, and the couple intended to live at 473 West 21st Street. Mary, who had never been in America before, was to be accompanied by her daughter Kathleen who had been born in Liverpool on 24th April 1917.

Mary Skelly (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Skelly (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Ellen Reynolds, 22, Dublin. Husband in United States Navy. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 1st September 1919.

Mary Ellen O’Rourke was born in Dublin on 25th January 1897 to Andrew O’Rourke of Liverpool and Ellen O’Rourke of Dublin. She had lived in Dublin from her birth until 1917, when she moved to Liverpool. On 16th May 1919 she married Edward Reynolds, a native of Crystal, North Dakota and a seaman in the U.S. Navy. Edward had entered the service on 14th May 1918 in Grafton, North Dakota. When Mary Ellen applied Edward was staying at the Criterion Hotel in Liverpool. She hoped to make her home in Grafton, and intended to sail on the USS President Grant on 3rd September 1919.

Mary Ellen Reynolds (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Ellen Reynolds (NARA/Ancestry)

Kathleen T. Sowder, 18, Ballard? Co. Dublin. Husband in United States Navy. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 9th July 1919.

Kathleen Kennedy was born in Brighton?, Ireland on 25th September 1900 to Terence Kennedy of Ballard and Alice Kennedy of Brighton?, Ireland. She had lived in Ireland all her life, and had never been to the United States. She moved to Liverpool on 4th July 1919 and at the time of her application was residing at St. John’s Hotel in that city. On 16th October 1918 Kathleen had married Jerome B. Sowder in Chapelizod, Dublin. They would celebrate the birth of their daughter Kathleen P. in Dublin a little over five months later on 2nd March 1919. Jerome was then serving as a Machinist 1st Class on USS Harrisburg. A native of Dearborn, Missouri, he had enlisted on 26th July 1917 in Kansas City, Missouri. He was still in the Navy at the time of Kathleen’s application, and was residing at the Criterion Hotel in Liverpool. Kathleen intended to sail on the USS Harrisburg on 8th July 1919.

Kathleen T. Sowder (NARA/Ancestry)

Kathleen T. Sowder (NARA/Ancestry)

Bridgie W. Phillips, 22, Esker, Co. Dublin? Husband in United States Navy. London Consulate. Passport issued 11th August 1919.

Bridget Whyte was born in Esker on 30th January 1897 to Thomas and Mary Whyte. She married Harold O. Phillips, a Chief Machinist Mate in the U.S. Navy in Rathdown, Co. Dublin on 26th June 1919. She had never been in the United States and had lived in Ireland all her life. She hoped to sail on 15th August 1919 on the SS Plattsburg, and intended to make her home in Mankato, Kansas.

Bridgie W. Phillips (NARA/Ancestry)

Bridgie W. Phillips (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Kerry

Elizabeth Mary Glasky, 22, Tralee, Co. Kerry. Husband in U.S. Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 25th March 1919.

Elizabeth Mary Lyons was born in Tralee on 9th August 1896. Her husband John Francis Glasky had emigrated to the United States around 1890, where he had made his home in Steubenville, Ohio. The couple had married in the first three months of 1918 in Cork, where Glasky was serving as a U.S.  Naval Rating. Elizabeth was making her temporary home at 1 Kerry Hall Terrace, St. Mary’s Road in Cork while she waiting to hear on her application.

Elizabeth Mary Glasky (NARA/Ancestry)

Elizabeth Mary Glasky (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Kildare

Norah Henderson, 20, Kildare. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 16th January 1919.

Norah Jones was born in Kildare on 3rd November 1898. She had lived in Ireland all her life and had never been to the United States. She married John Walter Henderson of the U.S. Navy, a native of North Bend, Pennsylvania, in Cork during the first months of 1918. Their new home was to be Renovo, Pennsylvania.

Norah Henderson (NARA/Ancestry)

Norah Henderson (NARA/Ancestry)

Eileen Vokes-Mackey Richardson, 23, Kildare. Husband in United States Navy. London Consulate. Passport issued 6th December 1918.

Eileen was born on 27th January 1895. She had married William Augustus Richardson, a native of Johnson City, Tennessee and a Lieutenant-Commander in the U.S. Navy. Eileen had never been to the United States. She applied for her passport on 6th December 1918.

Eileen Vokes Mackey RIchardson (NARA/Ancestry)

Eileen Vokes Mackey RIchardson (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Limerick

Margaret Burton, 24, Glin, Co. Limerick, Husband in United States Navy. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 30th June 1919.

Margaret Reidy was born in Killeaney, Glin on 15th April 1895. Her father Thomas Reidy was from Killeaney, while her mother Margaret was from Cloncowley in Drumlish, Co. Longford. Margaret had never been to the United States. It was while in Liverpool that Margaret met and married Harry Chambers Burton of Ohio, who had been born in 1888. Harry was a Chief Carpenter’s Mate in the U.S. Navy, and the two had married in Liverpool on 12th April 1919. While Margaret awaited a determination on her passport she was at the American Red Cross Hospital in Liverpool; Harry had gone back to the United States, and was at the B.17 U.S. Receiving Ship in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. Margaret hoped to sail to America on 3rd July 1919 aboard the SS Plattsburg. There the couple hoped to make their home at 17 East South Street in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Margaret Burton (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret Burton (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Mayo

Mary Florence Burck, 28, Westport. Husband in United States Navy? Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 25th March 1919.

Mary Florence Glynn was born in Westport, Co. Mayo on 26th September 1890. She had lived in Ireland all her life, but married New York native Frank Burck in Queenstown Church of Ireland church on 30th November 1918. Although it is not stated if Frank had a military role, it may well have been World War One that brought him to Cork. The couple intended to make their home at 226 Winthrop Street in Brooklyn.

Mary Florence Burck (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Florence Burck (NARA/Ancestry)

Catherine Weiss, 27, Castlebar, Co. Mayo. Husband in United States Navy. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 28th July 1919.

Catherine Kearney was born in Castlebar on 16th January 1892 to Peter and Norah Kearney, also of Castlebar. She lived in Castlebar until 1915, when she moved to Liverpool. On 26th July 1919 she married Otto Weiss, a native of Chicago, Illinois, in Liverpool. Otto was a 2nd Class Engineman aboard USS Louisville. At the time of her application Otto was staying at 13 Knowsley Road in Liverpool.

Catherine Weiss (NARA/Ancestry)

Catherine Weiss (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Roscommon

Elizabeth Kane, 30, Co. Roscommon. Husband in United States Navy. Belfast Consulate. Passport issued 12th August 1919.

Elizabeth Breen was born in Co. Roscommon on 24th February 1886 to Thomas Breen of Co. Wexford and Marie (Kearns) Breen of Co. Roscommon. Her husband Owen Kane was a native of Co. Louth and had emigrated to the U.S. from Liverpool around 1900, spending the next 18 years in Boston. He entered the U.S. Navy there around 1907, and the couple had been married in St. Alexander’s Church in Bootle, Liverpool, England on 20th July 1911. By the time of her application, Owen was a Chief Petty Officer serving in the engineroom of U.S. vessels. The couple had four children; Katharine and James were born in Boston on 4th April 1912 and 22nd June 1915 respectively, while Eileen and Leo were born in Omeath, Co. Louth on 28th April 1916 and 16th November 1918. Elizabeth had last arrived in Omeath (presumably to her in-laws home) from Boston on 5th November 1916. She intended to live at 7 Seaver Street in East Boston, and hoped to sail on the SS Plattsburg on 15th August 1919.

Elizabeth Kane (NARA/Ancestry)

Elizabeth Kane (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Tipperary

May Colkitt, 21, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary. Husband in United States Navy. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 17th January 1919.

May English was born in Clonmel on 19th November 1896. At the age of two she had moved to Liverpool, where she remained afterwards. There she met and married Mathew Stanley Colkitt of Medford, New Jersey. He was then serving in the U.S. Navy aboard USS Davis. The England and Wales Marriage Index suggests the wedding took place between July and September 1918; as the couple’s daughter Margaret L. Colkitt was born in Liverpool on 22nd July 1918, May was pregnant during the ceremony. At the time of her application May was still in Liverpool, but Mathew was already at 131 South Lord Street, Philadelphia, where she hoped to join him. May had never been to the City of Brotherly Love before.

May Colkitt (NARA/Ancestry)

May Colkitt (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Waterford

Christina Heise, 17, Waterford City. Husband in United States Navy. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 29th May 1919.

Christina Collins was born in Waterford City on 2nd June 1901 to Michael Collins (from Dublin) and Nannie (Dolan) Collins from Waterford. Christina had never been to the United States, and never been outside of Ireland. On 19th March 1919 she married Chief Machinist’s Mate Wilner Frank Heise, a native of Washington D.C. in St. Colman’s Cathedral in Queenstown. Wilner had entered the service around 1915. In the United States, Christina intended to make her home at 523 Pacific Street in Brooklyn.

Christina Heise (NARA/Ancestry)

Christina Heise (NARA/Ancestry)

Elizabeth Jizmejian, 22, Piltown, Co. Waterford. Husband in United States Navy. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 18th November 1918.

Elizabeth had been born in Piltown on 10th May 1896. In 1912 she moved to Cardiff, and since 1914 had made her home in Liverpool– she had never been to America. Her husband Joseph Arthur Jizmejian had initially emigrated to the United States from Le Havre on the 11th November 1912, and has been naturalised in New York on 11th June 1918. The couple had married in Liverpool on 24th March 1918, Joseph being in the U.K. with the United States Navy. Their home address was to be 200 East 27th Street in that city.

Elizabeth Jizmejian (NARA/Ancestry)

Elizabeth Jizmejian (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Westmeath

Mary Anne Robb, 24, Mullingar, Co. Westmeath. Husband in United States Navy. Dublin Consulate. Passport issued 6th June 1919.

Mary Anne Bennett was born in Mullingar on 27th December 1894 t0 James Bennett of Martinstown, Mullingar and Anne Bennett of Mullingar (Mary Anne’s mother had passed away by the time of her application). She had lived in Mullingar all her life and never been to the United States. On 22nd December 1918 she married George Francis Robb, a native of Brooklyn, in the Roman Catholic Cathedral in Mullingar. George was then a 1st Class Fireman serving in the U.S. Navy. He had entered the service in New York in March 1911. At the time of her application George was back in Newport, Rhode Island. Upon her emigration Mary Anne intended to make her home at 562 Grand Avenue in Brooklyn, and she hoped to sail on the USS Brooklyn on 15th June 1919.

Mary Anne Robb (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Anne Robb (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Wexford

Margaret Josephine Dion, 21, Wexford, Co. Wexford. Husband in United States Navy. Plymouth Consulate. Passport issued 6th August 1919.

Margaret Josephine Hogan was born on 25th March 1898 in Wexford. Her father Patrick was from Limerick, while her mother Margaret had been born in India. She had lived in Ireland and England all her life and had never been to the United States. She met and married 1st Class Storekeeper Chester Dion at St. Michael & St. Joseph Roman Catholic Church in Plymouth on 30th November 1918. It was noted that Chester had not served in the Plymouth base. He was from Escanaba, Michigan, and had entered the service around 1912. At the time of Margaret’s application Chester was serving aboard USS Parker at New York. The couple intended to make their home at 827 Kellogg Street, Greenbay, Wisconsin.

Margaret Josephine Dion (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret Josephine Dion (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Wicklow

Catherine (Kattie) McKenna, 19, Shillelagh, Co. Wicklow. Husband in United States Navy. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 28th July 1919.

Catherine Byrne was born in Shillelagh on 15th November 1899 to Simon Byrne and Annie Fallon (both of Hacketstown, Co. Carlow). Catherine was known as Kattie; she had made her home in Shillelagh until 1917, after which she moved to Dublin. Her husband Patrick McKenna had also been born in Ireland, emigrating to America from Queenstown around 1909, and living the next ten years in Philadelphia. He became a naturalised U.S. citizen in San Francisco in 1915. The couple had married at the Church of the Three Patrons, Rathgar, Dublin on 15th June 1919, while Patrick was serving as a 2nd Class Fireman on USS Harrisburg. 

Catherine McKenna (NARA/Ancestry)

Catherine McKenna (NARA/Ancestry)

The Wives of United States Army by County

Co. Clare

Dela Culligan, 26, Kilrush, Co. Clare. Husband in United States Army. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 28th July 1919.

Dela Talty was born in Kilrush on 8th February 1893. Her father Michael and mother Margaret (née O’Dea) were also both from Kilrush. She appears to have been in the United States prior to the war, saying she returned to Kilrush in November 1914. She was married to James Culligan Jr. of Philadelphia at St. Senan’s Church in Kilrush on 7th May 1919. At the time of her application James was serving as a Corporal in the American Regulating Station APO #927 in the Moselle Yards at Coblenz, Germany, having entered the service in New York. He was due to return to America and was being sent to Brest for embarkation. Dela intended to live at 500 West 165th Street in New York, and hoped to travel on the SS Harrisburg departing on 29th July 1919.

Dela Culligan (NARA/Ancestry)

Dela Culligan (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Cork

Rosina Billing Junghans, 21, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Army. London Consulate. Passport issued 6th June 1919.

Rosina Victoria Billing was born in Co. Cork on 4th July 1897 to Charles Billing of London and Rosina Billing of Winchester. She had lived in Britain and Ireland all her life. On 12th February 1919 she married Engineer Sergeant Paul Junghans Jr. in Winchester, a native of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. When she applied Paul was based at the Headquarters Detachment Engineers, A.E.F., London. Rosina intended to live at 312 Roberts Street, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin and hoped to sail on 10th June.

Rosin Billings Junghans (NARA/Ancestry)

Rosin Billings Junghans (NARA/Ancestry)

Eileen O’Donnell, 19, Mitchelstown, Co. Cork. Husband in United States Army. London Consulate. Passport issued 15th August 1919.

Eileen was born in Mitchelstown on 30th June 1901. She had lived in Ireland from her birth to that date, and had never been to the United States. Eileen had arrived in London on 4th August 1919. Her husband Edmund O’Donnell had emigrated to the United States in 1880, and had lived in Ansonia, Connecticut from that date until on, becoming a naturalized citizen there on 19th October 1896. At the time of their marriage Edmund was serving in the A.E.F., and 80 Howard Avenue in Ansonia was to be the couple’s home.

Eileen O'Donnell (NARA/Ancestry)

Eileen O’Donnell (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret O’Donoghue Tipton, 27, Cork City. Husband in United States Army. Paris Consulate. Passport issued 29th December 1919?

Margaret Mary O’Donoghue was born in Cork on 26th October 1892. On 7th June 1919 she married Lieutenant Andrew Ralph Tipton in Paris. Andrew was with 141e Aero Squadron of the AEF. He had been born in Tyler, Texas on 11th September 1896 and made his home in Clarkedale, Arizona. He entered the U.S. Army in Los Angeles in 1917.

Margaret O'Donoghue Tipton (NARA/Ancestry)

Margaret O’Donoghue Tipton (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Dublin

Georgina Scarry, 27, Dublin. Husband in United States Army. Dublin Consulate. Passport issued 28th July 1919.

Georgina Sandes was born in Dublin on 22nd October 1891 to Joseph Sandes and Georgina (Durkin) Sandes, both also of Dublin. She had lived in Dublin all her life and never been to the United States. On 22nd May 1919 she married Herbert J. Scarry in Dublin. Herbert, who was also a Dublin native, had emigrated to America via Liverpool around June 1915. He lived in Boston until 5th October 1917, when he enlisted in the United States Army. At the time of their marriage he was a Corporal in the Co. B.P.E.S. of the American Expeditionary Force. At the time of Georgina’s application Herbert was stationed in Bourges, Cherbourg in France. The couple intended to make their home at 12 Haughton Street in Boston.

Georgina Scarry (NARA/Ancestry)

Georgina Scarry (NARA/Ancestry)

Sheila Mary Ayers, 19, Dublin, Husband in United States Army. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 18th March 1919.

Sheila (née Brooks) was born in Dublin on 14th February 1900. Her parents James and Christina Brooks were both also born in Dublin. She had lived in Ireland’s capital until 28th April 1914, when she moved to Liverpool. On 26th December 1918 she was married at the Embarkation Camp in Liverpool to Sergeant John W Ayers of the 362nd Infantry, Company L. He had enlisted in El Centro, California on 26th April 1918 and was then stationed at the Embarkation Camp in Knotty Ash. The couple planned to make their home in Seely, California, and Sheila planned to sail on the Aquitania on 21st March 1919. She appears to be the sister of Christine Mary Brice below.

Sheila Mary Ayers (NARA/Ancestry)

Sheila Mary Ayers (NARA/Ancestry)

Christine Mary Brice, 25, Dublin, Husband in United States Army. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 18th March 1919.

Christine (née Brooks) was born in Dublin on 10th January 1894. She left Dublin for Liverpool in April 1914, where the war brought her in contact with Private Emmet T. Brice of Knoxville, Iowa. He was serving in Co. 12 Camp, JARD (162nd Infantry), having enlisted in Bentonville, Arkansas on 27th May 1918. The couple married in the Embarkation Camp at Liverpool on 19th January 1919. Christine was the sister on Sheila Mary Ayers above, and had never been to the United States. When Christine applied her husband was in the Embarkation Camp in Knotty Ash, the same location as Sheila’s husband. Like Sheila, she hoped to sail to her new life on the Aquitania on 21st March 1919. There the two sister’s journey together would end; when Christine got to America she was going to make her home in Siloam Springs, Arkansas– a long way from Sheila in California.

Christine Mary Brice (NARA/Ancestry)

Christine Mary Brice (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Galway

Delia Furey, 33, Craughwell, Co. Galway. Husband in United States Army. Dublin Consulate. Passport issued 23rd June 1919.

Delia Connolly was born in Craughwell on 21st April 1886 to Martin and Bridget Connolly. Her husband John J. Furey was from the same town, and both had emigrated to the United States in 1910. John variously made his home in Boston and Perth Amboy, and the couple were married on 6th September 1914 in Brooklyn. She left America on 15th September, only ten days after the wedding. Living first in Craughwell, Delia moved to Sutton, Co. Dublin in March 1915, where the couple’s son John Benedict Furey was born on 27th April 1915. Delia spent the war years as a waitress, moving from Sutton to Arcadia, Howth in June 1918. Meanwhile John J. had enlisted in the army at Syracuse, New York. He became a private in the 11th Company, 3rd Battalion on 31st July 1918 and was demobilised on 15th January 1919. As the wife of a serviceman, Delia was able to secure passage back to the United States for her and her son, which was the purpose of her application. She was to make her home with her husband at 403 Gordon Street in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. They were due to sail on the Army Transport SS Louisville on 24th June 1919.

Delia Furey (NARA/Ancestry)

Delia Furey (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Kerry

Mary Bridget Mannix, 27, Knockeenduff, Killarney, Co. Kerry. Husband in United States Army. Queenstown Consulate. Passport issued 2nd June 1919.

Mary Bridget O’Connor had been born in Knockeenduff on 8th February 1892 to Michael O’Connor of Loughtetene and Hannah (O’Shea) O’Connor of Kilcummin. She had married Denis Mannix at the Church of S.S. Mary & Anne, Shandon, Cork on 5th April 1913. Her husband was born in Keelclogherane, Co. Kerry, and had emigrated to the United States via Liverpool on 4th July 1914. Mary seems not to have gone with him; she had lived in Liverpool from 1907 to 1908, but the stated she spent the years between 1908 and 1919 in Ireland. Denis had declared his intention to become a U.S. citizen in Boston in 1916, and was due to be naturalized on his return from service in France. He had enlisted as a private in the 338th Infantry in Boston in July 1918 and was demobilised there in April 1919. Mary intended to live with Denis at 235 East Eagle Street in East Boston, and hoped to sail on the SS Plattsburg on 4th June.

Mary Bridget Mannix (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Bridget Mannix (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Kildare

Mary Agnes Down, 19, Newbridge, Co. Kildare. Husband in United States Army. Southampton Consulate. Passport issued 29th May 1919.

Mary Agnes Lally was born in Newbridge on 9th June 1899. Her father John was from Birr, Co. Offaly, while her mother Mary was from Fethard, Co. Tipperary. Mary had lived in England since September 1899. She met and married Ralph Edward Down of Iowa on 23rd December 1918 at St. Peter’s Church in Winchester. Ralph was serving as a private in the Quarter Master Corps, having entered the service in Iowa in April 1917. Mary hoped to make her home at 708 Birch Street, Atlantic, Iowa and hoped to sail aboard the SS Plattsburg on 4th June 1919.

Mary Agnes Down (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Agnes Down (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Louth

Mary Carroll, 29, Drogheda, Co. Louth, Husband in the American Expeditionary Force. Belfast Consulate. Passport issued 8th August 1919.

Mary Fitzgerald was born in Drogheda on 3rd May 1889– both her parents John and Annie were also from the town. She married Daniel Carroll of Bessbrook, Co. Armagh in Carrickcruppen (also Co. Armagh) on 25th January 1910. The couple thereafter emigrated to Chicago. Their first child, James, was born there on 17th January 1913; Mary returned to Bessbrook for the birth of their daughter, Mary Patricia, on 23rd July 1914. She remained in Ireland throughout the war, but her husband, still in America, enlisted as a Private in the A.E.F. in New York on 18th April 1918 and was discharged in May 1919. Daniel was now waiting for his wife at 316 East 54th Street in New York. Mary intended to sail with her children on the SS Plattsburg leaving on the 13th August 1919.

Mary Carroll (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Carroll (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Mayo

Anna Gaynard Shearn, 27, Derymore, Hollymount, Co. Mayo. Husband in United States Army. London Consulate. Passport issued 3rd July 1919.

Anna Marie Gaynard was born in Derymore on 21st July 1889 to Michael and Mary Gaynard. She lived in Ireland until 1909,before emigrating to Philadelphia. She returned to Ireland again in 1916 and stayed there until the time of her application. She married Patrick D. Shearn of Centralia, Pennsylvania in Kilcona, Ireland on 1st May 1918. At the time of her application Anna’s husband was at 2944 North Ringgold Street in Philadelphia. Anna hoped to sail to join him on 4th July. It was noted on her application that she had just come to London from Ireland and knew no-one there.

Anna Gaynard Shearn (NARA/Ancestry)

Anna Gaynard Shearn (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Monaghan

Mary Ellen McCarthy, 24, Monaghan. Husband in United States Army. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 2nd September 1919. 

Mary Ellen Sherlock was born in Monaghan on 25th October 1894. She lived there until March 1919, when she moved to Liverpool. Mary Ellen had never been to the United States. On 23rd August 1919 she married Patrick M. McCarthy, a native of Browning, Montana, at St. Mary’s Church in Bootle, Liverpool. Patrick was then awaiting redeployment to the United States. Mary Ellen intended to make her home with him in Browning.

Mary Ellen McCarthy (NARA/Ancestry)

Mary Ellen McCarthy (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Offaly

Nora McCabe, 27, Clara, King’s County (Offaly). Husband in United States Army. Dublin Consulate. Passport issued 7th August 1919.

Nora Bergin was born in Clara on 2nd July 1892 to Robert Begin, a native of Tipperary, and Mary (Dempsey) Bergin, of King’s County. She had lived in Ireland all her life. Her husband Joseph McCabe had been born in Dublin, and had emigrated to the United States via Liverpool around 1911. He lived in Jersey City for the next seven years, before enlisting there as a private in the American Army in April 1917. He was demobilised at Camp Upton, New York on 18th June 1919. The couple had been married in Dublin on 21st April 1919. Nora intended to make her home at 272 Hoboken Avenue, Jersey City, New Jersey, and hoped to sail from Liverpool on 13th August 1919.

Nora McCabe (NARA/Ancestry)

Nora McCabe (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Sligo

Elizabeth Scott, 22, Sligo. Husband in United States Army. Cardiff Consulate. Passport issued 21st August 1919.

Elizabeth Whittaker was born in Sligo on 14th April 1897 to John and Bridget Whittaker. She had lived in Britain and Ireland all her life, and gave her present address as 76 Phyllis Street, Barry Island in Wales. Her husband Edward W.J. Scott had been born in Barry, Wales and had emigrated to America from Cardiff in January 1917. He had married Elizabeth at Penarth, Wales prior to his departure, on 13th December 1916. Edward declared his intention to become a U.S. citizen in Brooklyn, and on 28th September 1917 entered the U.S. Army in the same location. At the time of Elizabeth’s application he was a Sergeant on Company B of the 326th Infantry, stationed at Brest and awaiting re-embarkation for America. The couple celebrated the birth of a daughter, Marie, at Penarth on 12th March 1917. Elizabeth intended to make her home at 54 Vandyke Street, Erie Basin, Brooklyn.

Elizabeth Scott (NARA/Ancestry)

Elizabeth Scott (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Tyrone

Mabel Christina Smith, 25, Strabane, Co. Tyrone. Husband in United States Army. Liverpool Consulate. Passport issued 1st September 1919.

Mabel Christina O’Reilly was born in Strabane on 16th December 1893 to Edward O’Reilly of Strabane and Mary O’Reilly of “Ballybraz.” She had lived in Ireland and England all her life, and had ever been to the United States. Her husband Robert Samuel Smith had also been born Strabane, and had emigrated to America via Liverpool around 1909. He had lived in Bridgeport, Connecticut until 1917, when he entered the U.S. Army. At the time of her application Robert was serving as a Corporal and was in Brest awaiting his return to the United States. Mabel was then living in Mossley House, Liverpool. The couple had married in Laragh, Co. Tyrone? on 20th August 1919. Mabel intended to travel on the SS President Grant on 4th September 1919, and to make her home at 31 Merchant Street, Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Mabel Christina Smith (NARA/Ancestry)

Mabel Christina Smith (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Wexford

Eleanor Jane Cassidy, 33, Bannow, Co. Wexford. Husband in United States Army. Paris Consulate. Passport issued 13th June 1919.

Eleanor was born in Bannow on 11th October 1885. She had married John Cassidy, a soldier in the U.S. Army, while in France. It is probable Eleanor was herself serving in some capacity, though this is not stated. John was from Philadelphia, which is where the couple intended to make their home. Eleanor had never been to America before.

Eleanor Cassidy (NARA/Ancestry)

Eleanor Cassidy (NARA/Ancestry)

Service/Residence in France by County

Co. Donegal

Isabel Wilson Warner, 28, Co. Donegal. Husband in United States Army. Application in United States. Passport issued 25th September 1919.

Isabel was born in Co. Donegal on 11th November 1887. Her husband William E.R. Warner, a New Yorker, was a Major in the A.E.F., and at the time of her application he was stationed in Paris. Isabel intended to travel from New York to join him in France, and hoped to sail as soon as possible in October 1919.

Isabel Wilson Warner (NARA/Ancestry)

Isabel Wilson Warner (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Dublin

 

Constance Ramony Gideon, 28, Dublin, Entertainer with the Soldiers in France. Application in Boston, Massachusetts. Passport issued 18th November 1918. 

Constance, who had been born in Dublin, was married to Kentuckian Henry Louis Gideon. The couple lived at 278 Highland Street, Dedham, Massachusetts. Constance was a musician, and was travelling to France as part of the “Over-There Theatre League under Y.M.C.A.” to entertain the troops. She planned on sailing from New York in November 1918 and intended to return to America when the war was over.

Constance Ramony Gideon (NARA/Ancestry)

Constance Ramony Gideon (NARA/Ancestry)

Carmel White, 31, Dublin, Red Cross Hospital Hut Service. Application in New York, New York. Passport issued 22nd October 1918. 

Carmel was born in Dublin on 21st August 1887. Her father Peter had died, and her mother Ann remarried on 18th July 1906 to an American citizen, an act which entitled her to citizenship though her step-father. She had lived in France and Belgium in 1904 and 1905 and between 1908 and 1912. She was now living at 145 West 58th Street New York where she worked as a dressmaker. She applied in September 1918 to go to France and work for the Red Cross Hospital Hut Service.

Carmel White (NARA/Ancestry)

Carmel White (NARA/Ancestry)

Evelyn G.N. Purcell, 31, Dublin, Army Nurse. Application in United States. Passport issued 23rd October 1917. 

Evelyn was born in Dublin on 8th October 1886. She emigrated to America from Liverpool aboard the Majestic in May 1900. She lived for the next 17 years in Mount Vernon, New York, and had become naturalized on 7th February 1913. She was now an Army Nurse, stationed with the Army Nurses Corps on Island No. 3, Ellis Island in New York. She required the passport to go to France in that capacity and intended to travel on 1st November 1917.

Evelyn Purcell (NARA/Ancestry)

Evelyn Purcell (NARA/Ancestry)

Ellen Smith Aunkst, 20, Dublin, Army Nurse? Application in France. Passport issued 4th October 1919.

Ellen was applying for her special passport at the U.S. Consulate in Brest, France. She had been born in Dublin on 4th July 1899. On 27th September 1919 she had married Private Thomas A. Aunkst at St. Loubes, France. He had been serving in the Camp Infirmary at Saint Sulpice, France. Thomas was a native of Dewart, Pennsylvania and had joined the U.S. Army on 5th September 1918 in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. Their new home address would be in Montgomery, Pennsylvania.

Ellen Smith Aunkst (NARA/Ancestry)

Ellen Smith Aunkst (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Fermanagh

Anne L. Carson, 30, Enniskillen, Nurse in United States Army Reserve Corps. Application in United States. Passport issued 13th July 1917. 

Anne was born in Enniskillen on 12th June 1887. She had emigrated to America from Londonderry aboard the Caledonia in February 1908, and had settled in Winchester, Virginia. She had been naturalized in Harrisonburg on 7th December 1915. Her home was now in Riverton, Virginia, where she worked as a nurse. She left the United States for Europe on 30th June 1917, landing in Liverpool on 9th July. In London when she applied for the emergency passport, it was intended that she would serve in France. The passport was issued on 13th July 1917.

Anne L. Carson (NARA/Ancestry)

Anne L. Carson (NARA/Ancestry)

Isabella McNeil Carson, 29, Enniskillen, Nurse in United States Army Reserve Corps. Application in United States. Passport issued 13th July 1917.

Presumably the sister of Anne, Isabella was born in Enniskillen on 25th December 1888. She emigrated with her on the Caldeonia in February 1908, and also settled in Winchester, Virginia. She was naturalized in Richmond on 3rd October 1916. Aside from her time in Virginia, she had also lived in the Philippine Islands. Her home address was now Riverton, Virginia. She had left the United States for Europe at the same time as her sister, and also intended to serve in France. Her passport was issued on 13th July 1917.

Isabella McNeil Carson (NARA/Ancestry)

Isabella McNeil Carson (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Longford

Marcella McCaw, 26, Longford. Army Officer’s Wife. Passport issued 29th August 1919.

Marcella was born in Longford on 29th September 1892. Her husband William McCaw was born in McKeesport, Pennsylvania. Marcella was making the application for her home in 329 South Highland Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where she was a housewife. She intended to bring herself and her daughter Peggy (then one year and four months old) to France, where her husband was serving as a Captain in the Medical Corps. She intended to leave the United States from New York on 1st September 1919.

Marcella McCaw (NARA/Ancestry)

Marcella McCaw (NARA/Ancestry)

Co. Waterford

Lucy Carolyn Main, 31, Waterford, Y.M.C.A. Entertainer. Application in Chicago, Illinois. Passport issued 20th August 1918. 

Lucy was born in Waterford on 9th September 1886. Her father William Holloway Main had been born in Adams Centre, New York and now lived in Chicago. In the pre-war years Lucy had also lived in England, Scotland and France as well as Chicago. A musician by trade, she had served as a Y.M.C.A. entertainer in France, England and Italy. She planned to return to Europe on 1st August 1918 from New York aboard a French steamer.

Lucy Carolyn Main (NARA/Ancestry)

Lucy Carolyn Main (NARA/Ancestry)

References

National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C.

      Passport Applications, January 2, 1906- March 31, 1925

      Emergency Passport Applications, Argentina thru Venezuela, 1906-1925

      Applications of Wives of Members of the AEF in Europe.

Irish Marriages 1845-1958 Database, Find My Past

U.S. Navy Casualty Reports

http://www.ancestry.com

http://www.findmypast.ie

http://www.fold3.com

Categories: 20th Century | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Chasing the Oval: Historic Reports of Rugby in Midleton, 1889-1967

For those interested in international rugby, exciting times are back as the 6 Nations Championship is once again in full swing. Midleton is a town that is now steeped in the rugby tradition, with strong links to the game through the town’s AIL club Midleton RFC, and also with Schools Rugby, notably Midleton College. We decided to take a look back through the pages of the Irish Examiner and gain a historic perspective on the game in the town, which stretches back into the 19th century.

Dave O'Callaghan (Munster Rugby) and Clive Ross (Ulster Rugby), both products of Midleton College, where rugby has been played since the 19th century

Dave O’Callaghan (Munster Rugby) and Clive Ross (Ulster Rugby), both products of Midleton College, where rugby has been played since the 19th century

More than 120 years before producing the likes of Dave O’ Callaghan and Clive Ross, Midleton College was fielding rugby teams. The Cork Examiner of 9th April 1889 brought news of an “interesting football match, under the Rugby rules” which took place between the College and the second fifteen of Cork Queen’s College. Unfortunately for the Midleton boys, the Cork students “displayed their superiority” from the moment of “the leather being put in motion” and emerged victorious by 1 goal and 2 points to no score.

9 April 1889 (Irish Examiner)

The report of the match between Midleton College and the Cork Queen’s College second fifteen, 9 April 1889 (Cork Examiner)

Midleton College faired much better in a game against Cork Grammar School in 1892. The Midleton ream “rushed to the front” and showed some nice “give and take play” to score a try, which was soon followed by another. However, despite some “well-concentrated rushes” in the second half they failed to add to their tally, but luckily held on for the win, by 1 goal and 2 tries to 2 tries.

19 October 1892 (Irish Examiner)

The report of the match between Midleton College and Cork Grammar School, 19 October 1892 (Cork Examiner)

Midleton College’s Gloster, who had been a standout in the 1892 game, was still going strong in 1895, when Midleton took on Tipperary College. The strength of the Tipp team left Midleton dependent “almost entirely on the swiftness of their forwards,” but apparently they were ” not able to show on the soft ground.” Whenever “the oval” came into a Midleton forward’s hands, the “would not have gone twenty yards when he made the acquaintance of mother earth.” When the final whistle sounded, Midleton had been defeated by four tries to nil.

29 November 1895 (Irish Examiner)

The match report of Tipperary College and Midleton School, 29 November 1895 (Cork Examiner)

Outside of Midleton College, the town’s first Rugby Football Club was founded in the 1927/28 season (for a summary of the history of clubs in the town, see the Midleton RFC site here). It only survived for a few years, but despite that made an impression on the community. The Cork Examiner brought an advertisement on 29th September 1928 for the First Annual Dance to support the club, which was due to take place on Tuesday 2nd October in Midleton Town Hall. Perhaps in an effort to attract the ladies, women enjoyed a reduced entrance fee, while a discount was available for couples. A running buffet was planned, with dancing scheduled from 9 pm on; musical accompaniment was to brought by Brierley’s Dance Band.

29 September 1928 (Irish Examiner)

Advertisement for the First Annual Dance of Midleton RFC, 29 September 1928 (Cork Examiner)

We are fortunate that some images of this iteration of Midleton RFC are left to us. The Cork Examiner of 27th March 1929 ran a photograph of the team that had put Dungarvan to the sword by 16 points to 3.

27 March 1929 (Cork Examiner)

The Midleton RFC team who defeated Dungarvan 16-3, 27th March 1929 (Cork Examiner)

Despite the demise of the first Midleton RFC, the town was not left without a team, as there was separate entity called the Midletonettes taking the field. As explained by the present-day Midleton RFC website, it was this team that is regarded as the direct antecedent of the current club.

8 February 1932 (Cork Examiner)

Rugby results, included the score of the Conettes and the Midletonettes, reported on 8 February 1932 (Cork Examiner)

 

29 November 1932 (Cork Examiner)

The Mideltonettes defeat the Covettes, reported on 29 November 1932 (Cork Examiner)

The modern Midleton RFC played their first game against Bandon in 1967, the beginning of a long and proud tradition. The “oval ball” still gets a consistent outing in the town, drawing crowds today much as it did more than 125 years ago. The story of the game, and indeed of the town’s history in other sporting codes, is something we hope to return to in future posts.

Categories: 20th Century, Nineteenth Century | Tags: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Visiting the “Old Country”: Photographs & Stories of Returning Midleton Emigrants, 1915-1924

We recently looked at Midleton emigrants who found themselves in New York Poorhouses in the 19th Century. Returning to the topic of emigration, we have taken a look at United States passport applications in the 1910s and 1920s by people who had been born in Midleton. In all bar two of the cases below, these were emigrants from the town or parish who were seeking to return to visit Cork. The majority of them were doing so to reunite with family. As per usual, there are some fascinating stories among them. Edmond Bowler was travelling to “visit the Old Country”, while Margaret Talbott was going to “see the old homestead.” Some, like Joseph Hickey, were going to see their parents. Joseph had apparently not been back to Ireland since his emigration, but he had been to France– serving with the American Expeditionary Force during World War One. Mary Ryan was going back to Whitegate with her newborn to show off the child to her father, while the entire Buckley family where making the journey to attend to “family business.”

The 'Celtic', a vessel that a number of the Midleton emigrants returned on (Imperial War Museum via Wikipedia)

The “Celtic”, a vessel that a number of the Midleton emigrants returned on (Imperial War Museum via Wikipedia)

Throughout these emigrants lives, connections to Midleton remained strong. Abbie Keefe had emigrated as a young child, and in almost 50 years never returned to Ireland. Yet she still kept contact with relatives here, and eventually returned in old age to visit them. Hannah Walsh spent 52 years in Boston without going home, but at the age of 75 she sold up her Boston house, returning to Midleton to live out her final days with her sister.

Two of the passport applications below are not like the others. They were made not by Midleton emigrants in the United States, but by two young women from the parish who had never been out of Ireland. Both had married U.S. sailors stationed in Queenstown during World War One, and they were now hoping to start new lives in America. In the case of one of the women– Bridget Mahony (Lynch)– the marriage came after her pregnancy, a situation that was likely difficult for her in 1919 Ireland.

In reviewing the below, readers should note that the applications of married couples often prioritised the man’s details; also married Midleton women retained their married name on the application, making it difficult to determine their maiden names. By far the most remarkable element of these passports is what they have left us, as in each one is a photographic image of the applicant. They have been included beneath each bio below.

The "Philadelphia", another of the ships on which Midleton emigrants returned (US Navy Research Center)

The “Philadelphia”, another of the ships on which Midleton emigrants returned (US Navy Research Center)

William J Ahern, Passport Issued 15th April 1916

William was born in Midleton on 4th November 1869, and had emigrated to America aboard the Pavonia on 11th May 1887. He had never been home to Ireland in the intervening 29 years. He became naturalized in New York in 1899, where he still lived, at 55 Horatio Street. He worked as a Marine Engineer. He intended to travel back to Midleton for one year to see his wife and children. His intention was to sail aboard the Philadelphia on 22nd April 1916.

William J Ahern (Ancestry)

William J Ahern (Ancestry)

Edmond Bowler, Passport Issued 8th May 1920, Passport Issued 3rd July 1922

In his application Edmond stated that he was born in Midleton on 8th September 1869, and had emigrated to the United States from Liverpool in June 1895. He spent the next 25 years living in New York without ever travelling home. He became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1918. His occupation was a Railroad Gateman, and he lived at 139 East 15th Street. He planned to visit Cork for three months, sailing aboard the Celtic on 15th May 1920. When asked to put down his reason for travelling home, he initially wrote “Visit the Old Country”, but scratched out “the Old Country” and replaced it with “relatives.” Edmond again applied for a passport in 1922, when his address was 143 East 18th Street. His intention was again to visit relatives, and he hoped to sail on the Baltic on 8th July 1922.

Edmond Bowler (Ancestry)

Edmond Bowler (Ancestry)

Daniel Buckley, Passport Issued 13th July 1920

Daniel stated that he wanted to travel to Ireland with his wife Mary and children Mary (12), Anna (11), William (9) and Helen (1). He was born in Midleton on in July 1876, and had emigrated to the United States from Queenstown in October 1898. He lived at 140 Rodney Street in Brooklyn, and had become a naturalized citizen in 1905. A Stable Foreman by trade, he had previously visited Ireland from May to August in 1914. The purpose of this visit was given as “family business.” Like Edmond Bowler, he intended to travel on the Celtic, sailing on 28th August 1920.

The Buckley Family (Ancestry)

The Buckley Family (Ancestry)

John Cronin, Passport Issued 10th February 1920

John was born in Clonmult on 21st June 1886. He noted that his father was called Edmond. John emigrated from Queenstown on 4th September 1911 and went to Spokane in Washington State. He was naturalized there in 1917. In 1920 he lived in Rosalia, Washington where he was a clergyman. He intended to travel to Europe for 6 months, to visit family in Ireland, be a tourist in England and be a tourist in France and Belgium. He planned to leave New York aboard the Philadelphia on 22nd May 1920.

Father John Cronin (Ancestry)

Father John Cronin (Ancestry)

Richard Cronin, Passport Issued 12th March 1920

Richard mentioned that he was born in Midleton on 13th June 1869. He sailed to the United States from Ireland in 1886, spending the next 24 years in America without visiting home. He had spent from 1890 to 1919 in the U.S. Navy, and was naturalized in 1899. He lived at 413 West 19th Street following his retirement from the service. He wanted to go back to Midleton to visit relatives and because his health was failing. He intended to sail on the 20th March 1920.

Richard Cronin (Ancestry)

Richard Cronin (Ancestry)

William Duhig, Passport Issued 19th December 1919

William was travelling home “to visit my mother who lives in Midleton.” His father Michael was now dead. He said he was born in the town on 14th February 1889, and had left for America from Queenstown on 24th May 1910. He spent the next 7 years in Boston, before spending more than a year at home. He now wanted to spend another 6 months with his mother, intending to travel on the S.S. Carmania on 21st January 1920. In Boston he worked as a Wool Grader, and lived at 7 Allen Street.

William Duhig (Ancestry)

William Duhig (Ancestry)

Thomas John Galvin, Passport Issued 15th March 1923

Thomas was born in Midleton on 22nd December 1868; he recorded that his father Garrett from Midleton was now dead. He had emigrated from Queenstown on 10th May 1887 and he had been naturalized in 1896. He had returned home before, spending almost a year in Cork between December 1898 and November 1899. He worked as a laborer and made his home at 520 45th Street in Brooklyn. He intended to sail aboard the President Adams on 9th April 1923 in the company of his Irish wife Kathleen, with the purpose of his trip being a “visit.”

Thomas Galvin (Ancestry)

Thomas Galvin (Ancestry)

Lillian Hart, Passport Issued 28th June 1920

Lillian was born in Midleton on 19th January 1885; her husband was an American, Burnham Hart from West Cornwall, Connecticut. They lived at 192 Bradhurst Avenue in New York. The purpose of the trip was for Lillian to see her parents. She intended to travel aboard the Baltic on 4th September 1920.

Lillian Hart (Ancestry)

Lillian Hart (Ancestry)

Joseph Hickey, Passport Issued 11th August 1921

Joseph noted that he had been born in Midleton on 1st February 1886, and he had emigrated out of Queenstown on 11th March 1905. He had never visited home in all the time since, and was naturalized in California in 1919. However, he had been abroad- Joseph had served in France during World War One with the American Expeditionary Force. He now lived at 26th Street and 4th Avenue in New York, where he worked as a painter. He was going back to Midleton to see his parents, and intended to stay 6 months. His intended sailing was aboard the Olympic on 13th August 1921.

Joseph Hickey (Ancestry)

Joseph Hickey (Ancestry)

Abbie Keefe, Passport Issued 27th August 1921

Abbie was born in Midleton on 10th December 1867; her husband Morris was also from Ireland. He emigrated from Queenstown around 1866, and lived in Aurora, Illinois until 1903 (presumably the year of his death). Abbie had emigrated in 1875, and had now moved from Aurora to Waterbury, Connecticut, where she was keeping house. She hoped to go to Ireland for one year to visit relatives. It is interesting to note that Abbie had emigrated to America as a child, yet despite the passage of nearly 50 years was still going to visit her birthplace.

Abbie Keefe (Ancestry)

Abbie Keefe (Ancestry)

Margaret Kowalski, Passport Issued 3rd September 1919

Margaret had been born in Midleton on 12th September 1899 and had lived in Ireland “all my life” and had “never been in U.S.” She applied to the U.S. Consulate in Queenstown for a passport, as she had married Wenceslaus Kowalski of the United States Navy in Midleton on 15th March 1919. He was a native of Milwaukee, Wisconsin where he lived at 914 11th Avenue. By the time Margaret applied, Wenceslaus had been moved on to Liverpool.

Margaret Kowalski (Ancestry)

Margaret Kowalski (Ancestry)

Katherine Lee, Passport Issued 29th November 1920

Katherine was born in Clonmult on 22nd December 1882. Her husband, Hugh Lee, was a native of Boston but had died. Katherine had lived in America from 1904, and appears not to have been home. She now lived at 61 Farragut Road in South Boston, where she had no occupation. She was travelling home to Clonmult to visit her father, and hoped to leave on the Celtic on 11th December 1920.

Katherine Lee (Ancestry)

Katherine Lee (Ancestry)

Bridget Mary Mahony, Passport Issued 8th July 1919

Bridget applied to the U.S. Consulate in Queenstown for a passport, citing her status as a wife of a member of the naval forces of the United States.She hoped to travel from Queenstown to the United States in the company of her daughter Veronica Mahony, who had been born at Queenstown on 9th May 1919. Bridget was born in Midleton on 7th May 1897, and her husband George Daniel Mahony had been born in America. She had married her husband in St. Colman’s Cathedral on 1st January 1919; he was then serving as a cook in the U.S. Navy aboard the USS Imperator. George had enlisted in Boston in May 1915. Bridget related that her father was Thomas Lynch from Midleton, and her mother was Mary (Geary) Lynch also from the town. Given the respective dates of the couple’s matrimony and the birth of their child, it seems likely that Bridget was pregnant with Veronica prior to their marriage. Bridget related that she was “never in [the] U.S.A.’ and had been in “Ireland all my life.” She intended her permanent address to be New York City.

Bridget Mary Mahony (Ancestry)

Bridget Mary Mahony (Ancestry)

Thomas McCarthy, Passport Issued 18th September 1924

Thomas was born in Midleton on 15th December 1861. His father had been Charles McCarthy, and he was now dead. Thomas had emigrated from Queenstown 1887, and spent the next 37 years in America without returning home. He made his home at 168 Prescott Street, Worcester, Massachusetts, where he was a Wine Inspector. He gave travel as the purpose of his journey, and intended to leave Boston on the Scythia on 21st September 1924.

Thomas McCarthy (Ancestry)

Thomas McCarthy (Ancestry)

Joseph Moore, Passport Issued 13th July 1915

Joseph applied for his passport in San Francisco, California. He was born in Midleton on 1st December 1881 and had emigrated aboard the Lukania from Liverpool on 31st December 1899. He had never returned to Ireland in the intervening period, but had travelled throughout the States, living in Boston, New York, Baltimore, Goldfield (Nevada), Oakland and San Francisco. He had been naturalized in San Francisco in 1908. His permanent residence was now Oakland, where he worked as a Horticulturist. He planned to go to Ireland to “attend to the settlement of my father’s estate” and also hoped to stop off in England to visit friends.

Joseph Moore (Ancestry)

Joseph Moore (Ancestry)

Annie Parker, Passport Issued 23rd September 1924

Annie was born in Whitegate on 13th April 1877. She left for America in 1892, and now lived at 3174 23rd Street in San Francisco, where she was engaged in housework. She had married Joseph Parker (from San Francisco) in Chicago on 4th October 1894 and had been widowed on 18th October 1918.Apparently having ever been home, Annie hoped to spend almost a year in both Ireland and England visiting relatives.

Annie Parker (Ancestry)

Annie Parker (Ancestry)

Mary Ryan, Passport Issued 10th June 1920

Mary intended to travel back to Midleton with her newborn child Mary for about two to three months. She had been born in Midleton on 29th January 1888, and her husband Stephen Ryan had also been born in Ireland. He had emigrated aboard the Cymric from Queenstown on 19th April 1905 and had spent the next 15 years in America. He was naturalized in 1919, and the family now lived at 20 Grafton Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts. The purpose of Mary’s visit was to visit her father, and she hoped to sail on 21st July 1920.

Mary Ryan (Ancestry)

Mary Ryan (Ancestry)

Margaret Talbott, Passport Issued 10th April 1922

Margaret was born in Midleton on 14th June 1870. Her husband Edward Talbot had also been born in Ireland. He had emigrated in 1888 and spent the next 34 years in Chicago. Margaret had lived in the United States uninterrupted for 36 years between 1886 and 1922, making her home at 6751 East End Avenue in Chicago. The purpose of her visit to Ireland was to “see the old homestead” and “visit relatives.” She planned to leave on the Celtic from New York on 3rd June 1922.

Margaret Talbot (Ancestry)

Margaret Talbot (Ancestry)

Hannah Walsh, Passport Issued 14th July 1920

Hannah was born in Midleton on 20th December 1835. Her husband Michael had also been born in Ireland and had emigrated from Queenstown in 1861, living in Boston until his death in 1890. He had been naturalized in 1868. Hannah had emigrated in 1867, and in the 52 years since had never been home to Ireland, living in Boston where she was a Lodging House Keeper. She was going back to Ireland to “reside with her sister,” and had arranged to sell her house to that purpose. She intended to leave on the Caronia on 24th July 1920.

Hannah Walsh (Ancestry)

Hannah Walsh (Ancestry)

References

Selected Passports. National Archives, Washington, D.C. [Accessed via Archive.com]

Categories: 20th Century | Tags: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Searching for Midleton’s Missing 19th Century Emigrants

In a previous post on the site (see here) we looked at advertisements placed in the New York Irish American Weekly newspaper seeking information about East Cork immigrants. In an era where many people were illiterate, and communication often difficult, it was easy for families and friends to lose touch with one another. One way Irish emigrants tried to find loved ones was through placing ‘Information Wanted’ advertisements in Irish immigrant newspapers in the hope that the person they sought might hear of it. In this post, we have compiled the significant number of Information Wanted ads from the Boston Pilot, looking specifically at people from Midleton.

The Midleton advertisements range in date from 1841 to 1911, and are organised chronologically. Many are extremely poignant, as brothers and sisters, mothers and fathers sought to find each other, often after many decades apart. Here we discover Midleton people who had tried to make new lives, like James McSwiney who became a farmer in California, or Daniel Sullivan, who likely followed gold to New South Wales. John Buckley, who lived on Midleton’s Main Street, hoped to find his brother in New Jersey, while James Dexter was wondering why his brother had never returned to Boston following a visit to their mother on Chapel Street four years previously. The influence of the Pilot was far reaching– one of the most poignant advertisements sees Midleton’s Thomas Denehy, then living in Wollongong in Australia, seek to make contact with his brothers and sister who had emigrated to America 50 years before. Why not take a look through the ads (arranged chronologically) and see if you recognise any of the family names.

How the 'Information Wanted' advertisement for Jeremiah Hegarty, Midleton, appears in the New York Irish American Weekly (New York Irish American Weekly)

How the ‘Information Wanted’ advertisement for Jeremiah Hegarty, Midleton, appears in the New York Irish American Weekly (New York Irish American Weekly)

6th November 1841

INFORMATION WANTED OF JOHN COTTER, a native of Middletown, county Cork, Ireland. When last heard from he was in the employ of Charles Stark, Grocer, Charleston, South Carolina. His brother Edmund, who lives in Rockbottom, Ms., is anxious to hear from him. Should this meet his eye, he is requested to write immediately. Catholic Miscellany please copy.

5th November 1842

INFORMATION WANTED OF BARTHOLOMEW KEEFE, of the Parish of Carrictouhal, co. Cork, when last heard from was in Newport, R.I. His wife’s maiden name is Hennessy, a native of Middletown, co. Cork. They had one child when leaving home named Donnell. Any information respecting them will be thankfully received by Jeremiah Hennessy, addressed to 249 Ann st. Boston, Ms.

5th October 1844

INFORMATION WANTED OF BARTHOLOMY WALSH, a native of Middleton, Co. Cork, Ireland- when last heard from, was in Norfolk, Va.; any information respecting him would be thankfully received by his niece Ellen Sheehan, (alias) Mrs. Cody, Hartford, Ct.

25th January 1845

INFORMATION WANTED OF JOHN MARA, a native of parish of Middleton, co Cork. He left Boston on the 11th day of June last, and is about 27 years of age. Any information respecting him will be thankfully received by his sister, Mary Mara, care of Robert Garnett, 13 North Square, Boston, Ms.

17th May 1845

INFORMATION WANTED OF TIMOTHY LEAHY, formerly of Kilmountain, parish of Middleton, co. Cork, who came to this country about 8 years ago. When last hear from he was in Louisville, Ky, two years ago. Any information in relation to him will be thankfully received by his brother, Maurice Leahy, addressed to the care of Michael Leahy, No. 17 Hamilton street, Boston, Ms, or at this office.

6th February 1847

INFORMATION WANTED OF PHILIP CARRAUS, a native of Ballinthontis, parish of Middleton, co. Cork, who emigrated in 1844, and landed in New York, and is now supposed to be in Middleton, Ct. Any information respecting him will be thankfully received by Richard Shea, care of Mr. O’Hern, West Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Ms.

18th September 1847

INFORMATION WANTED OF ABIGAIL FITZGERALD, who was married to a man by the name of Simon Welsh. She is a native of Middletown, co. Cork. They are supposed to be in Albany or Troy. Her brother, Patrick, is anxious to hear from her. Address him, Randolph, Ms.

6th November 1847

INFORMATION WANTED OF CATHERINE HARTNET, from Middleton, co’y Cork, who formerly lived as cook with Mrs. James Murphy in Middleton, and who left Liverpool in April, 1847, for New York, will write to Ellen Cannovan, care of Rufus Perkins, No. 51 Summer street, Boston, where she is to be found, she will get intelligence much to her advantage.

10th March 1849

INFORMATION WANTED OF MICHAEL COTTER, a native of Middleton, co. Cork, who left Ireland about 8 or 9 years ago, – when last heard from he was in Montreal, L.C. Any information respecting him will be thankfully received by his brother, Edmond Cotter, care of Mr. Benjamin Dayton, corner of Leveret and Brighton streets, Boston, Ms.

15th September 1849

INFORMATION WANTED OF DAVID AHERN, who emigrated to this country about 7 year ago and landed in Quebec. He is a native of Middleton, co. Cork. When last heard of was in Port Trent, District of Victoria, Upper Canada. Any information respecting him will be thankfully received by his brother, Mr. John Ahern, Hyde Park, Lackawana Iron Works, Luzerne County, Pa.

4th July 1851

INFORMATION WANTED OF MRS. LANE and Family having emigrated from Middleton, co. Cork, to the United States, some time since, – a friend in Charleston, South Carolina, wishes to hear from them. Should this meet their eye, they will please address J.B., Charleston, S.C.

16th August 1851

INFORMATION WANTED OF JOHN DALY, from parish of Middleton, co. Cork, who emigrated to this country 13 or 14 years ago, – was in New York when last heard from. Also, his daughter, HONORA DALY, who landed in Quebec 4 years ago last April. Also, PATRICK DALY, Sadler, who was in Quebec, when last heard of. Any information of them will be thankfully received by his son, JOHN DALY, care of Edmond Ryan, Montpelier, Vermont.

23rd August 1851

INFORMATION WANTED OF MICHAEL MCNAMARA of Middletown, co. Cork, who got married to Catherine Doyle, at Ireland Depot, Ms, in June, 1848. His brother-in-law, PIERCE DOYLE, wants to hear from them, and will thankfully receive any information directed to Indianapolis, Ia.

24th August 1850

INFORMATION WANTED OF SAMUEL WALSH, (gardener), and Abigail Walsh, otherwise Fitzgerald (his wife), natives of Middletown, co Cork, who left Ireland in 1831; when last heard from they were in Albany, N.Y., about 11 years ago, and supposed to be at present in Virginia. Any information respecting them will be thankfully received by her brothers, James and Patrick Fitzgerald, Randolph, Ms.

2nd October 1852

INFORMATION WANTED OF MICHAEL & MARY GOLDEN, from parish Middleton, who sailed from Cove in July, 1847- landed in New York. When last heard from were in Quayekey N.Y. He is a tailor by trade. Any information respecting them will be thankfully received by his brother, DANIEL GOLDEN, Baker, – or by BARTHOLOMEW TAYLOR, No. 87 Ann street, Boston, Ms.

2nd December 1854

INFORMATION WANTED OF JOHN CRONIN, of Middleton, co Cork, who left home 2 yrs ago and was year since in Jago, near Buffalo, NY. Information will be received by his wife Honora, care of A A Cody, Middletown Conn.

6th October 1855

INFORMATION WANTED OF MICHAEL FITZGIBBON, of Middletown, co Cork, who landed in New York in 1850; when last heard from was in Rockett, Worcester co, NY. Please address his sisters Margaret and Ellen, care of John White, 58 Liverpool st, East Boston, Mass.

13th October 1855

INFORMATION WANTED OF PATRICK & MARTIN BARRY, of Middleton, co’y Cork, who were last heard of in Corning Steuben co, NY, and are supposed to be in Michigan. Information received by their brother John, Floras Depot, Dinwiddy co, Va.

24th November 1855

INFORMATION WANTED OF JOHN, Mary and Bridget MOORE, of parish Middleton, co’y Cork; when last heard from John was in Albany 7 years ago. His father is anxious to hear of him or his sisters. Please address John Moore, care of Mr P Doyle, Arcade, Toronto, CW.

5th January 1856

INFORMATION WANTED OF MARGARET AHEARN, of parish Middleton, Cork, who came to this country about 6 months ago, and landed in New York city, where she was last heard from. Information received by her sister Ellen, care of Miss. Eliza Ahearn, 23 Joy st, Boston, Mass.

16th February 1856

INFORMATION WANTED OF JOHN and JOSEPH SCANLIN, native of Midletown, Co Cork, when last heard of John was some four years ago, was in Pittsburg. Information received by their sister Mary; address, care of Mathew Lians, No 54 Light St, Baltimore.

8th March 1856

INFORMATION WANTED OF MARY FAILY, (then her maiden name) of parish Middleton, co Cork, who when last heard of, 3 years ago, was in Catherine Slip, No 27 New Market, N York city. Information received by her brother William, Galena, Ill.

28th June 1856

INFORMATION WANTED OF ELLEN and JOHANA SHEA, of Middletown, who sailed from Cork 4 years ago last September; when last heard from , about 2 years since, were in Columbus, Ohio. Johana is married to John Hinchy, of the county Clare, who was last heard of in Toledo, O. Information received by their brother Michael, Little Valley, Catteraugus county, NY.

18th October 1856

INFORMATION WANTED OF MRS. OLIVER, (maiden name Mary Fitzgerald,) a native of Middleton, who came to this country in 1836; when last heard from was in Dark county, Indiana. Information received by her sister, Bridget Burns, Zanesville, Ohio.

3rd April 1858

INFORMATION WANTED OF DENIIS O’BRINE, painter by trade, formerly of Middleton; when last heard from he was living in Sea Street, Boston. Information received by his sister, Mrs Elizabeth O’Sullivan, Jackson, Miss.

23rd October 1858

INFORMATION WANTED OF JAMES FITZGIBBON, native of parish of Middletown, who landed in Boston in 1854, and when last heard from was in Missouri, in June, 1856. Any person knowing his whereabouts would confer a great favor by addressing his sister Catherine, Roxbury, Mass.

11th December 1858

INFORMATION WANTED OF PATRICK KEEFFE, from Middleton, who came to this country 3 or 4 years ago. Information will be thankfully received by his brother Owen, Woodberry, Baltimore county, Maryland.

2nd April 1859

INFORMATION WANTED OF DENIS O’KEEFE, a native of parish Middleton, who went to England about 13 years ago, came to America shortly after, and was last heard of in Cincinnati, Ohio, in Seventh street. Should he or any one acquainted with him see this, he will hear of something to his advantage by addressing his brother John’s wife, (maiden name Ann Fitzgerald) or Thomas McDonough, Waukegan, Lake county, Illinois.

28th May 1859

FIVE DOLLARS REWARD. INFORMATION WANTED OF DENNIS O’KEEFE, of Middleton, parish of Middleton, county Cork, who went to England 11 years ago and came to America a short time after; when last heard of he was in Seventh street, Cincinnati, Ohio. There has been a certain amount of money willed to him by his uncle. The above reward will be paid for any information of him, dead or living. All particulars can be learned by addressing Mrs. Ann Foy, or Thomas McDonough, Waukegan, Lake county, Illinois. [Advertisement was again repeated on 20th August 1859]

10th March 1860

INFORMATION WANTED OF DENIS BUCKLEY, who came to this country in April, 1857, and, when last heard from, was living in New Jersey. His brother, John, who lives in Main Street, Middletown, county Cork, Ireland, is anxious to hear of him, care of his cousin, Denis Conway, Middleton, Mass.

22nd September 1860

INFORMATION WANTED OF THOMAS FITZGERALD, of parish Middleton, who left Nashville, in October, 1858, for Cincinnati. Please address Helen Fitzgerald Nashville, Tenn.

13th July 1861

INFORMATION WANTED OF JEREMIAH CASHMAN, who left the parish of Middleton in 1854, and is supposed to have gone to Chicago or Kentucky. His mother and friends are anxious to hear from him at 270 North Eutau street, Baltimore, Maryland.

13th December 1862

INFORMATION WANTED OF JOHN WALSH, a blacksmith by trade, native of the parish of Lisgoold, Middletown, county Cork; when last heard from in February last, had landed in Boston, and began working at his trade. His age is about 20 years. Any information of him will be thankfully received by his sister Eliza Walsh, No 3 Clark st, Newport, RI.

13th October 1866

INFORMATION WANTED OF JOHN MULLINS, of Middleton, county Cork, who sailed from Liverpool for this country in 1859. He is supposed to be in some of the Western States. Any information concerning him will be thankfully received by his brother, Jeremiah Mullins, Burlington, Vermont.

13th July 1867

INFORMATION WANTED OF GARRET BARRY, (butcher) a native of the parish of Lisgool, county Cork, Ireland, who left Middleton, county Cork, for this country in the year 1844 or ’45, and has not been heard from since. Any information of him will be thankfully received by his brother, John Barry, No 6 Lawrence street court, Charlestown, Mass.

22nd February 1868

INFORMATION WANTED OF DANIEL SULLIVAN, a native of Middleton, county Cork, who left Ireland about 15 years ago and came to Boston. he left Boston about eleven years ago, and went to New South Wales; when last heard from, about seven years ago, he was in Munderlow Bridge, New South Wales. Any information of him will be thankfully received by his father, Daniel Sullivan, No. 42 Billerica street, Bost, Mass. New South Wales papers please copy.

24th October 1868

INFORMATION WANTED OF PATRICK DEXTER, a native of Chapel Road, Middleton, county Cork, Ireland. He went home from Boston about four years ago to see his mother, and left there to come back to Boston. Any information of him will be thankfully received by his brother, James Dexter, 128 Albany street, Boston, Mass.

5th February 1870

INFORMATION WANTED OF JAMES McSWINEY, a native of Middleton, county Cork, Ireland; when last heard of was in San Francisco, Cal; he wrote to his sister Jane in September, 1859; said he had a farm of one hundred acres in Penola Valley, Contra Costa country, Cal. He is about 28 years of age, and has been to sea some time after leaving Middleton. Any information of him, dead or alive, will be thankfully received by his sisters, Jane or Bessie McSwiney, Main street, Middleton, county Cork, Ireland; or by John Mahoney, Co. G, 3d Regiment U.S. Cavalry, Fort Union, New Mexico. California papers please copy.

26th February 1870

INFORMATION WANTED OF EDMOND O’LOUGHLIN, formerly of Middleton, county Cork, now living in Boston, will oblige a cousin by sending his present address to C.R., Post-office, Montreal, Canada.

28th May 1870

INFORMATION WANTED OF MARGARET SCANLAN, a native of parish of Middleton, county Cork, who married a man by the name of Michael Hennisy, about 20 years ago; when last heard from, about 10 years ago, she was in Springfield, Mass. Information will be received be her sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Fitzgerald, Stark, Brown county, Minn.

2nd July 1870

INFORMATION WANTED OF FANNY CALLAHEN, from Middleton, county Cork, who came to this country about 10 years ago, she got married since, but don’t know her husband’s name; when last heard from was in West Constant, outside of Boston. Information of her will be received by her brother, John Callahen, Onota, Grand Island, Lake Superior, Mich.

16th July 1870

INFORMATION WANTED OF WILLIAM O’CONNELL, a native of Middleton, county Cork, who left Charleston, Kinawa county, West Virginia, in June, 1869, and has not been heard from since. Information of him will be received by his wife, Mary O’Connell, Charleston, Kinawa county, West Virginia.

22nd April 1871

INFORMATION WANTED OF THOMAS WHITE, baker by trade, son of John and Margaret White, a native of Middleton, county Cork; when last heard from was in Melbourne, Australia. Information concerning him will be received by his sisters. Address Hanora White, care of John Flynn, No. 5 Mystic Place, Charlestown. Mass.

17th June 1871

INFORMATION WANTED OF MICHAEL LOMASNEY, a native of Castlmartyr, county Cork, who emigrated from Middleton, of said county, in 1869; aged 26 years; when least heard of he was in Savannah, Georgia, January, 1871. Information of him will be received by his brother, Thomas Lomasney, Portland, Middlesex county, Conn.

14th October 1871

INFORMATION WANTED OF THOMAS CONAL, or his wife (maiden name Nellie McCarty), born in Middleton, county Cork, who came to Boston 26 years ago; they moved from Boston to Norwich, Conn., where they lived about seven years; when last heard from, about 18 years ago, they were in the State of New York. Information of them will be received by her brother, Timothy McCarty, No. 1 Foster place, Boston, Mass. [an advertisement of 21st October corrects to ‘born in Churchtown, near Middleton’]

27th June 1874

INFORMATION WANTED OF JOHN MCDERMOTT, Middleton, co. Cork, who left Ireland about four years ago, and landed in New York; from there he went West. His brother heard a short time ago that he was in New Hampshire, but left there for Maine or Massachusetts. Any one knowing where he is will confer a great favor by addressing his brother, Patrick McDermott, corner of Warren and Jefferson streets, East Cambridge, Mass.

12th September 1874

INFORMATION WANTED OF COLMAN and MICHAEL SISK, of Midleton, county Cork, who are supposed to be residing at present in some one of the Eastern States. Any person knowing their present address will confer a great favor by communicating the same to William Kidney, corner of Compton and Clark avenue, St. Louis, Mo.

21st August 1875

INFORMATION WANTED OF PATRICK, COLEMAN and MICHAEL SPLAIN, sons of Patrick Splain and Johanna Day, parish of Midleton, county Cork; they left Ireland 25 years ago; when last heard from Michael and Patrick were in Washington county, Vermont, and Coleman somewhere in Massachusetts. Information of them will be received by Lawrence Splain, Putnam county, N.Y.

14th January 1877

INFORMATION WANTED OF ANDREW HYDE, formerly of Middletown, county Cork; when last heard from was in Portland, Conn. Information of him will be received by his sister, Minnie Hyde, 374 Main Street, Charlestown, Mass.

24th January 1880

INFORMATION WANTED OF OWEN O’KEEFFE, son of Owen and Ellen O’Keeffe (maiden name Coleman), a native of Middleton, county Cork, who left home about 28 years ago, and went to England; left there for this country; when last heard from was in California. Information of him will be received by his brother, John O’Keeffe, Hingham, Mass.

21st May 1892

INFORMATION WANTED OF MRS. MARY COTTER, (born Mary Upton), a native of parish of Middleton, County Cork, who came to this country when young. It is known that she settled in Boston, and that her family are at present living in this city, Boston or vicinity. Any information of her, or any of her family, will be thankfully received by Miss Maggie Upton, a niece of Mrs. Cotter. Address 2256 North Ninth Street, Philadelphia, Pa.

22nd April 1905

INFORMATION WANTED OF ELLIE KENEALY, daughter of John Kenealy, hardware merchant of Midleton, County Cork, Ireland, who I think is now in Boston , or vicinity, will communicate with John Walsh, of East Berlin, Conn., she will hear of something to her advantage.

23rd December 1911

INFORMATION WANTED OF MICHAEL and DENIS and HONORA DENEHY, brothers and sister, born near the town of Middleton, County Cork, Ireland, went to America about 1860 or 1861; last heard of was at Boston Mass. Brother Thomas, address Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia, would like to hear from above or any of their family.

References

Harris, Ruth-Ann M., Donald M. Jacobs, and B. Emer O’Keeffe, editors. Searching for Missing Friends: Irish Immigrant Advertisements Placed in “The Boston Pilot 1831–1920”. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1989.

Categories: 20th Century, Nineteenth Century | Tags: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

‘Few Families…Suffered As We Did:’ War of Independence Pension Files Associated with Midleton

The Military Archives have released another tranche of material relating to the Easter Rising, War of Independence and Civil War. Included among them are some more pension files that connect to service during the War of Independence around the Midleton area. There will be further releases in the coming months and years, but already there is much to interest us locally among what is available. The pension files in particular can contain great insights into the War of Independence in East Cork. Take for example the statement included in the pension application of Christina Ahern, of Cumman na mBan, charting her experiences during the conflict:

From the inception of the volunteers in East Cork, our house, situated midway between Carrigtwohill and Midleton, was a recognised clearing house for all Volunteers activities. We also had a business in Cobh and maintained daily communication for volunteer purposes there. As stated in my claim our house was burned and my eldest brother brutally killed and things got so bad that we could not engage a farm labourer as they would not stay any time with us. Actually some members of the A.S.U. [Active Service Unit] were sent to us from time to time to assist in the farm work and to provide protection. Both my mother and an invalid sister died shortly after the Truce and their deaths can be attributable to a certain extent to the strain they had undergone. My younger brother who was a very active volunteer officer and a member of the A.S.U. died in 1923. As a result of all our activities our farm property had eventually to be sold and our prosperous market gardening business at Cobh had to close up. I think I can honestly say that few families in the South of Ireland suffered as we did. I am not claiming from a sympathetic point of view but for my service as O/C [Officer Commanding] of the Cumann na mBan and the statements made in my claim can be fully verified.

The burnt cottage at Clonmult, where 12 members of the local Flying Column were killed (a further two were executed later). Many of these men had participated in the Midleton Ambush.

The burnt cottage at Clonmult, where 12 members of the local Flying Column were killed (a further two were executed later).

All of these files are free to access and we would encourage you to explore them. Those currently available with direct links to Midleton are as follows (click on the hyperlinks to access the file):

 

Categories: 20th Century, War of Independence | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cork’s Darkest Day of World War Two? Cork Losses on HMS Glorious, 75 Years Ago

The 8th June 2015 marks the 75th anniversary of one of the Royal Navy’s costliest engagements of World War Two. This date also has significance for Cork, as it almost certainly represents the worst single day’s loss of Cork men serving in Allied forces during the entire conflict. On that day at least 22 natives of the Rebel county were killed when HMS Glorious, HMS Ardent and HMS Acasta encountered the German battlecruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau off the coast of Norway. The vast majority of them were in their late teens and early twenties. 

HMS Glorious in May 1940 (U.S. Naval Historical Center)

HMS Glorious in May 1940 (U.S. Naval Historical Center)

In early June 1940 the Royal Naval Aircraft Carrier HMS Glorious had been sent to Narvik to assist with the evacuation of British forces from Norway. Early on the morning of 8th June, she set through the Norwegian Sea for her return trip to Scapa Flow, accompanied by her two destroyer escorts, HMS Ardent and HMS Acasta. Around 4 o’clock that afternoon the Glorious spotted two vessels on their western horizon. Disastrously for the isolated vessels, these proved to be the extremely formidable German battlecruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau.

HMS Ardent was the first to close with the Germans as she sought to identify the ships; she came under fire from them just before 4.30. In an effort to protect the Glorious from the enemy, Ardent released smoke to conceal her charge. Before the smoke took full effect, Glorious was struck for the first time. The distance at which the Scharnhorst hit her– 24,000 metres, or some 24km– illustrates the extreme range under which naval combat could commence. Over the course of the next two hours the Glorious sought to escape while the Ardent and Acasta tried desperately to protect her. Their efforts were doomed. Ardent was the first to be sunk, going down at around 5.25 pm. Glorious was sent to the bottom around 6.10, followed by Acasta some ten minutes later. There were few survivors; for those who did succeed in getting off the ships, the failure of the German vessels to pick up survivors consigned many to death by exposure. Only around 45 men survived– a staggering 1,519 sailors were lost. (1)

Each of the three Royal Naval ships carried Irishmen among their compliments. Below are details on the 22 Corkmen and 15 other Irish sailors from the 26 counties who we have identified as being lost that day. Where possible we have sought to uncover more detail about their origins through baptismal records and Census returns, but we are eager to hear from readers who may have additional information on any of them. Behind each of their names are individual stories of life and, ultimately, loss. Among their number are young men like 19-year-old Patrick Pearse Murphy from Cork City, a boy clearly named for the 1916 Revolutionary leader, who ultimately gave his life fighting for the British against Nazi Germany. Tragically the list also includes brothers James and Joseph Regan; it is hard to imagine what it must have been like for their family in Leap, Co. Cork, when word came through that both had been lost aboard Glorious, 75 years ago next week.

The Scharnhorst (German Federal Archives)

The Scharnhorst (German Federal Archives)

HMS Glorious 

Barrett, James. Leading Seaman, age 26. Son of William and Margaret Barrett, Bandon. Co. Cork. The 1911 Census records James’s father William (34), a shoemaker, living with his wife Margaret (26), son John (3) and daughter Elizabeth (2) at 24 Cavendish Quay in Bandon.

Calnan, Timothy. Stoker First Class, age not given. Son of Timothy and Hannah Calnan, Lispatrick, Co. Cork. Timothy Senior was recorded as a39-year-old fisherman in the 1911 Census. He lived at a house in Lispatrick Lower, Ballymackean with his new wife Hannah (31) and niece Maggie (16).

Daunt, James. Chief Petty Officer, age 37. Son of Thomas and Teresa Daunt of Rostellan, Co. Cork. The 1911 Census records the Daunt family at house 12 in Farsid, Rostellan. James was then 9-years-old and living with his 28-year-old mother Teresa and 2-year-old sister Emily. 

Hayes, Denis Anthony. Able Seaman, age 22. Son of Timothy and Helena Hayes, Skibbereen, Co. Cork.

Holland, James Christopher Holland. Stoker First Class, age 25. Son of James and Mary Holland of Kinsale, Co. Cork.

Kelly, Joseph Patrick. Petty Officer Writer, age 23. Son of Patrick J. and Helena M. Kelly, Summerhill, Co. Cork.

McCarthy, John David. Stoker First Class, age 21. Son of Timothy and Mary McCarthy, Kinsale. Co. Cork.

Minihane, Denis John. Stoker First Class, age 23. Son of Denis and Mary Minihane, Rosscarbery, Co. Cork. The only Denis Minihane on the 1911 Census was a 21-year-old agricultural labourer and is likely Denis John’s father. He lived in Downeen.

Murphy, John Stanislaus. Stoker First Class, age 22. Son of John T. and Sheila Murphy, Youghal, Co. Cork.

Murphy, Patrick Pearse. Able Seaman, age 19. Son of Patrick J. and Ellen Murphy of Cork. Born in Cork City in 1920. 

O’Brien, James Francis. Stoker First Class, age 25. Son of Denis and Mary O’Brien of Cork.

O’Leary, Joseph. Stoker First Class, age 21. Son of Daniel and Mary O’Leary, Clonakilty, Co. Cork. In 1911 Joseph’s parents Daniel (a 30-year-old agricultural labourer) and Mary (20) had just celebrated the birth of their son Michael John who was 6 months old. They lived with Mary’s parents and siblings at a house in Knockskagh, Clonakilty. 

Regan, James. Leading Stoker, age 24. Son of Jeremiah and Margaret Regan, Leap, Co. Cork. His brother Joseph died with him. As far as I can establish the Regan’s father Jeremiah was originally from Brulea, Co. Cork.

Regan, Joseph. Stoker First Class, age 22. Son of Jeremiah and Margaret Regan, Leap, Co. Cork. His brother James died with him.

Regan, Timothy. Able Seaman, age 33. Son of Jeremiah and Mary Regan, Rosscarbery, Co. Cork.

Roche, John Michael. Stoker First Class, age 21. Son of Nicholas John and Margaret Roche, Rosscarbery, Co. Cork.

Russell, Denis Augustine. Stoker Second Class, age 20. Son of Jeremiah and Catherine Russell, Cork. Denis was born in Cork City in 1919.

Stack, Thomas. Petty Officer Stoker, age 36. Son of Michael and Hanna Stack, Youghal, Co. Cork. In 1911 the Stacks lived at 4 Foxes Lane, Youghal. Thomas was (incorrectly?) recorded as a 2-year-old boy living with his father Michael, a 34-year-old general labourer, his mother Johanna (30), sisters Mary (3) and Ellen (1).

Thornhill, John. Able Seaman, age 19. Son of John and Mary Thornhill, Watergrasshill, Co. Cork.

HMS Ardent (Imperial War Museum FL870)

HMS Ardent (Imperial War Museum FL870)

HMS Ardent

Hegarty, Michael John. Able Seaman, age 28. Son of Michael and Anne Hegarty of Castletownshend, Co. Cork.

Lucey, James Joseph. Leading Seaman, age 26. Son of Denis and Mary Lucey of Cork.

HMS Acasta (Wikipedia)

HMS Acasta (Wikipedia)

HMS Acasta

Kiernan, Francis Augustin. Supply Assistant, age 25. Son of Francis R. and Margaret M. Kiernan of Cork. Francis was born in Cork City in 1914. 

Kevin Myers has noted that 65 men from the island of Ireland died as a result of the sinkings of Glorious, Ardent and Acasta. Aside from the 22 Cork men outlined above, I have identified a further 15 men from the the 26 counties who perished on that June day. Their names are recorded below. (2)

The Gneisenau (German Federal Archives)

The Gneisenau (German Federal Archives)

Other Irish Casualties

Byrne, Patrick William. HMS Glorious. Stoker Second Class, age 23. Son of Peter and Mary Byrne, Dublin.

Collins, James. HMS Glorious. Stoker First Class, age not given. Son of Michael and Mina C. Collins, Kilnaboy, Co. Clare.

Doyle, Benedict Leo. HMS Glorious. Able Seaman, age 24. Son of Michael and Mary Doyle, Dublin.

Duggan, Dermot Harry Tuthill. HMS Ardent. Surgeon Lieutenant, age 27. Son of Captain George Grant Duggan (Royal Irish Fusiliers) and Dorothy De Courcy Duggan, Foxrock, Co. Dublin. Dorothy not only lost her son in World War Two, but her husband in World War One. George, an Irish international cross-country runner, was killed in Gallipoli on 16th August 1915 and is remembered on the Helles Memorial.

Fogarty, Marcus. HMS Glorious. Leading Sick Berth Attendant, no age given. Son of William and Ellen Fogarty, Killenaule, Co Tipperary.

Forsyth, John Thomas. HMS Glorious. Able Seaman, age 20. Son of John and Amy Forsythe, Sandycove, Co. Dublin.

Keogh, Patrick Kevin. HMS Glorious. Able Seaman, age 19. Son of Mary and Jane Keogh of Dublin.

Koyce, John. HMS Acasta. Stoker First Class, age 21. Son of Patrick and Hannah Koyce of Limerick.

Langan, Maurice. HMS Glorious. Stoker First Class, age 33. Son of Peter and Anne Langan, Tarbert, Co. Kerry.

McGhee, Edmond. HMS Glorious. Ordinary Seaman, age 18. Son of John and Elizabeth McGhee, Kilkenny

Pearse, George Passmore. HMS Glorious. Surgeon Lieutenant, age 31. Son of Charles Perrin Pearse and Ellen Gertrude Pearse, Glenageary, Co. Dublin.

Pender, John. HMS Glorious. Ordinary Seaman, age 19. Son of Mrs. C. Pender, Gorey, Co. Wexford.

Porter, William. HMS Glorious. Able Seaman, age 26. Son of William and Mary Porter, Annamore, Co. Wicklow.

Stuart, Francis. HMS Glorious. Petty Officer Stoker, age 31. Son of James and Alice Stuart, Marino, Co. Dublin.

White, William Patrick. HMS Glorious. Able Seaman, age 27. Son of Christopher and Catharine White, Dermotstown, Delahasey, Co. Dublin.

(1) Howland, McMurtie; (2) Myers;

References

Howland, Vernon M. Loss of HMS Glorious

McMurtie, Francis E. 1946. The Tragedy of HMS Glorious

Commonwealth Wargraves Commission

Myers, Kevin., 9th June 2010, Irish Independent. Let Us Not Forget Irish Deaths in Calamitous Events of 1940. 

Categories: 20th Century | Tags: , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

The Cork Men Who Died at Dunkirk & in the Fall of France, 75 Years Ago

On 10th May 1940, 75 years ago, the German army swept into the Low Countries and France. It was a campaign that culminated in Operation Dynamo– the famed evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force at Dunkirk a little less than a month later. The Irish Free State remained neutral during the conflict, but despite this large numbers of Irishmen served in Allied forces during the war. On the occasion of the 75th anniversary we have been looking at local men who were involved in the 1940 fighting, and also taking a wider look at the impact of the Fall of France on Cork families.

The Commonwealth Wargraves Commission records 14 men with Cork connections who died during the campaign. There are undoubtedly many more– if you have details of any please pass them on to us. They include Private John Cashman of the Leicestershire Regiment, formerly of 12 Railway Terrace in Midleton. He was killed in action on 26th May 1940 and is remembered on the Dunkirk Memorial. Another is Stoker Patrick Stanton of H.M.S. Havant, from Rostellan. He was killed during a Stuka attack on 2nd June 1940. It is worth sparing a thought for these and the other Cork men who lost their lives trying to stem the Nazi onslaught in the summer of 1940, 75 years ago.

British troops wading out to a destroyer to evacuate at Dunkirk © IWM (HU 41240)

British troops wading out to a destroyer to evacuate at Dunkirk © IWM (HU 41240)

2nd Class Aircraftman (Wireless Operator) Patrick Aherne, 110 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

Age 20. Son of William Aherne and Bridget Aherne (Shanahan) of Youghal. Died 14th May 1940. Buried Sedan-Torcy French National Cemetery. Patrick served on a Bristol Blenheim light bomber and died when his plane was taken down while attacking German forces around Sedan. You can find more details on his plane here.

A Blenheim of 110 Squadron in August 1940 © IWM (HU 104641)

A Blenheim of Patrick Aherne’s 110 Squadron in August 1940 © IWM (HU 104641)

Private Patrick Daniel Foley, 7th Royal Sussex Regiment

Age 21. Son of Richard and Hanna Foley of Cork. Died 20th May 1940. Dunkirk Memorial. Patrick served in A Company, and died in the battalion’s first encounter with German troops. You can read about their experiences facing German tanks and infantry on 20th May in the battalion War Diary here.

Flying Officer (Pilot) Francis Derek Bird, 59 Squadron, Royal Air Force

Age 23. Son of John Bowyer Bird and Elizabeth Mary Bird of Buttevant. Died 22nd May 1940. Winner 440 yards and equal first in the Long Jump, Inter Services Athletic Meeting, 1937. Francis’s father John appears on the 1911 Census living as a boarder in the Nice residence at 150 Davis Street, Mallow. He was a Detective Inspector in the R.I.C. Like Patrick Aherne, Derek flew a Bristol Blenheim. His aircraft was shot down near Fricourt.

Blenheims of 59 Squadron taking off in France in 1940 © IWM (C 1166)

Blenheims of Francis Bird’s 59 Squadron taking off in France in 1940 © IWM (C 1166)

Guardsman Brian O’Flynn, 2nd Irish Guards

Age 20. Son of William and Kate O’Flynn of Cork. Date of death unknown, but between 23rd May and 4th June 1940. Buried Outreau Communal Cemetery.The 2nd Irish Guards were particularly heavily engaged around Boulogne. You can read more about that engagement here.

Fusilier William Joseph Steele, 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers

Age 20. Son of William and Annie Steele of Cork, husband of Kathleen Josephine Steele of Spangle Hill, Cork. Died 26th May 1940. Buried Dunkirk Town Cemetery.

The 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers in France, 1940 © IWM (O 159)

Joseph Steele’s 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers in France, 1940 © IWM (O 159)

Fusilier Michael Keating, 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers

Age 22. Son of Michael and Christina Keating of Carrigrohane. Died 26th May 1940. Buried Shorncliffe Military Cemetery.

Men of the 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers manning a French anti-tank gun in France, 1940 © IWM (F 2149)

Men of the 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers, Michael Keatings regiment, manning a French anti-tank gun in France, 1940 © IWM (F 2149)

Private Timothy Patrick Cronin, 2nd Dorsetshire Regiment

Age 27. Son of Stoker 1st Class Christopher Cronin, Royal Navy and Christine Cronin of Cork. Died 26th May 1940. Dunkirk Memorial. Christine Cronin not only lost her son at Dunkirk– her husband Christopher had also died on active service while serving on H.M.S. Swindon on 30th November 1919. He is buried in Lyre Catholic Churchyard. You can read about the Dorsetshire actions along the La Bassée Canal where Timothy was killed here.

Inspection of men of the 2nd Dorsetshires in France, 1940 © IWM (F 2572)

Inspection of men of the 2nd Dorsetshires in France, 1940, the regiment in which Timothy Cronin served © IWM (F 2572)

Private John Cashman, 2/5th Leicestershire Regiment

Age 31. Son of Thomas and Margaret Cashman of Midleton. Died 26th May 1940. Dunkirk Memorial. The 1911 Census shows the family living at 12 Railway Terrace in Midleton. Then 3-year-old John was living with his sisters Mary (7) Margaret (6), mother Margaret (30), father Thomas (40) who worked as a carrier, and grandfather John (70) who was a retired groom. You can see a photo of John and details of his service here.

Stoker 1st Class William John O’Shea, H.M.S. Pangbourne

Age 28. Son of Dennis and Maria O’Shea of Drishane. Died 31st May 1940. Dover (St. James’s) Cemetery. The 1911 Census shows William’s parents Dennis (34), a farmer, and Maria (22) living with Dennis’s brother Cornelius (26) and parents William (69) and Margaret (68) at 13 Drishane More. William died as a result of wounds inflicted during a Stuka dive bomber attack on his vessel as part of the evacuation. For an extremely graphic account of this attack and its impact on Pangbourne click here.

HMS Pangbourne © IWM (FL 17237)

HMS Pangbourne, the vessel on which William O’Shea suffered his mortal wound © IWM (FL 17237)

Able Seaman Harry Vincent Hazeldene, H. M. Tug St. Abbs

No age given. Son of William and Elisabeth Hazeldene of Blackrock. Died 1st June 1940. Portsmouth Naval Memorial. Harry lost his life when the St. Abbs was sunk by German aircraft off Dunkirk during the evacuation. You can see details of where the St. Abbs now rests on the seafloor here.

Leading Stoker Patrick Stanton, H.M.S. Havant

Age 40. Son of Patrick and Bridget Stanton of Midleton. Died 2nd June 1940. Plymouth Naval Memorial. Patrick was killed when Stukas bombed the Havant during the Dunkirk evacuation. The 1911 Census records Patrick aged 12 living at 21 Ballynafarsid, Rostellan with his parents Patrick (42), a coachman, mother Bridget (43) and large group of siblings; Margaret (17), Bridget (14), Sarah (11), Christina (7), Daniel (6), Richard (5), Thomas (4), William (3) and baby Francis. You can read about the Havant here.

HMS Havant (Wikipedia)

HMS Havant, on which Patrick Stanton died (Wikipedia)

Sapper John Healy, 2nd Stevedores, Royal Engineers

Age 46. Husband of Ellen Healy of Spangle Hill. Died 3rd June 1940. Buried Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre.

Sapper David Fox, 2nd Stevedores, Royal Engineers

Age 40. Son of Patrick Fox and Catherine Fox (Helleher) of Cork, husband of Mary Fox (O’Connor) of Cork. Died 3rd June 1940. Buried Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre. The 1911 Census shows 12-year-old David living in an apartment at 41 Boyce’s Street in Cork with his mother Kate (54), laborer brothers William (23) and John (21) and sister Bridget (15). It is interesting to note that David served in the same unit as John Healy, they died on the same day, and are buried in the same cemetery.

Lance Corporal Robert Allen, 1st Supply Base Depot, Royal Engineers

Age 26. Son of John George Allen and Susan Allen of Cork. Died 17th June 1940. Dunkirk Memorial.

Royal Irish Fusiliers in France, 1939 © IWM (O 758)

Royal Irish Fusiliers in France, 1939 © IWM (O 758)

Categories: 20th Century | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

The Story of Ambrose Haley: The World War One Australian Digger Buried in Midleton Graveyard

On 30th December 1918 a party of mourners were led by Canon O’Connor to an open graveside beside the main path at the Church of the Holy Rosary cemetery in Midleton. Those in attendance had walked to the church from the railway station at the other side of town, where they had met and formed a cortège behind a flag-draped coffin. The elm casket had been carried to the church by Timothy Murphy undertakers, who were based on the Main Street. Passers-by would have noted a number of unusual aspects to the funeral; the flag was not the Union Jack, as might be expected, but rather was adorned with the Southern Star. As well as that, the soldiers in attendance wore the slouch hat that marked them not as British troops, but men of the Australian Imperial Force. The young man in the coffin– Ambrose Augustine Haley– was laid to rest in the cemetery following a requiem mass. But he was not a local; indeed he had been born and raised on the other side of the world, thousands of miles away in Tasmania. How was it that he had come to be buried in East Cork? We decided to explore his story. (1)

Gunner Ambrose Haley (Australian War Memorial)

Gunner Ambrose Haley (Australian War Memorial)

Ambrose Augustine Haley was born to Thomas Haley and Mary Ann Haley (née Fox) on 7th December 1892 in Portland, Tasmania. Thomas worked as a clerk, and not long after Ambrose’s birth the family moved along the coast to St. Helens. There Thomas ended up working for J.C. Mac Michael & Co. General Merchants and Importers, who had branches in both St. Helens and Lottah. As Ambrose grew to adulthood he embarked on a career as an accountant, but also found time for more martial pursuits, spending a year in the cadets. (2)

Ambrose was not among the first rush of volunteers for service in the army; indeed he was not the first of his family to join the colours. His younger brother Jack enlisted in the recently formed 40th Battalion at Claremont, Tasmania on 8th March 1916. The 21-year-old shop assistant must have looked forward to heading to the seat of action, but he was to be disappointed. After just over a month Jack was discharged as medically unfit. The reason was the impaired vision he suffered in his left eye, the result of an accident with a whip when he was a child. Ambrose decided to take the plunge only a few months after his brother. On 7th November 1916, at the age of 23 years 11 months, the young accountant entered a Claremont recruiting office; when he emerged he was a gunner in the Australian army. The following year a third brother, Urban, would make the same journey. He enlisted on 23rd March 1917 at the age of 20– as he was under 21 his parents had to sign a permission slip for him to be deployed overseas. Thomas and Mary Ann consented, but his father stipulated that the consent was predicated on the fact that ‘he goes in a clerical position as promised by the Minister of Defence in the case of Military Staff Clerks.’ By this point in the war, everyone was aware of the risks. (3)

Australian artillerymen laying an 18 pounder at Maribyrnong in 1917 (Australian War Memorial)

Australian artillerymen laying an 18 pounder at Maribyrnong in 1917 (Australian War Memorial)

Ambrose spent the first few weeks of his service in Tasmania, before leaving his island home for what would prove the final time in January 1917. On the 9th of that month he sailed for the mainland, where he joined a pool of artillery reinforcements based at Maribyrnong near Melbourne. Here he waited for his deployment overseas while training continued. On 11th May Ambrose boarded the troop transport Ascanius, bound for Devonport, Plymouth. The young Tasmanian was off to join the Australian Imperial Force in Europe. The arduous journey to the other side of the world took more than two months, and Ambrose didn’t have a good time of it. He had to spend a day in the ship’s hospital en-route, and was no doubt delighted to finally arrive in England on 20th July 1917. (4)

The Ascanius which brought Ambrose to Europe (Australian War Memorial)

The Ascanius which brought Ambrose to Europe (Australian War Memorial)

It is difficult to imagine what it must have been like for the young Tasmanian arriving in England for the first time, but whatever his feelings, Ambrose was given little time to acclimatise. He was immediately whisked off to Larkhill in Wiltshire, home to the School of Instruction for Royal Horse and Field Artillery. For nearly eight weeks he continued his training as a gunner with No. 3 Battery, Reserve Brigade Australian Artillery, before word finally came that he was on the move again– this time to the Western Front. The 18th September 1917 found Ambrose in Southampton, boarding a vessel bound for France. (5)

Australian artillery in action in Passchendaele, October 1917 (Australian War Memorial)

Australian artillery in action in Passchendaele, October 1917 (Australian War Memorial)

In France Ambrose initially formed part of the 12th Reinforcements of the 15th Field Artillery Brigade, but within a few days he received his permanent assignment. He became a gunner in the 2nd Field Artillery Brigade, which formed part of the artillery compliment of the 1st Division, Australian Imperial Force. When he joined his new unit in Belgium on 5th October, they were in the midst of the bloody slog that was the Third Battle of Ypres, better known as the Battle of Passchendaele. Having spent months in training and traveling, Ambrose was finally at the front. It was not an environment he would experience for very long. (6)

Shell dump for Australian artillery at 'Birr Crossroads', near Ypres in October 1917, the mnth Ambrose was wounded © IWM (E(AUS) 1991)

Shell dump for Australian artillery at ‘Birr Crossroads’, near Ypres in October 1917– the month Ambrose was wounded © IWM (E(AUS) 1991)

Only six days after joining his unit, on 11th October 1917, Ambrose was shot in the left arm. He was rushed to 3rd Australian Field Ambulance at Wippenhoek, which was described as ‘an old and very well designed rest station to accommodate 300 cases.’ Among the facilities were a number of rudimentary buildings, including a hospital nissen hut and a small kitchen. Ambrose was one of 23 men admitted to the Field Ambulance on the 11th, which at the time was caring for 249 patients. (7)

Members of the 13th Australian Field Ambulance at Passchendaele © IWM (E(AUS) 839)

Members of the 13th Australian Field Ambulance at Passchendaele © IWM (E(AUS) 839)

From Wippenhoek, Ambrose was moved to the 17th Casualty Clearing Station. By the 12th October he was a patient in the 7th Canadian General Hospital at Étaples, the major depot area for British and Commonwealth troops in France. His long road to recovery was only just beginning. He was still in hospital in February 1918, four months after he was hit. Shortly thereafter it appears he had recovered sufficiently to be given some leave. It was probably at this time that Ambrose traveled to Ireland, although he may have done so when he initially arrived in Europe. The reason he visited is also the reason that would ultimately see him buried in the town. Midleton had been the home of Ambrose’s grandmother, Mary Josephine Lynch. Mary had apparently been one of the first pupils of Midleton’s Presentation Convent, before she emigrated to Colebrook, Tasmania in the mid-19th century. Ambrose’s mother Mary Ann Fox was her daughter. Apparently no fewer than six of Mary Josephine Lynch’s grandchildren and a son-in-law enlisted in the Australian military during World War One. According to the Irish Examiner, the same Midleton Lynch family also had men serving in the American army in France. Ambrose’s grandmother had lived on William Street (now the New Cork Road), and the young Tasmanian Digger still had Lynch relatives living there. The 1911 Census records them at No. 51, where 79-year-old Margaret Lynch resided with her daughters Helen and Elizabeth, granddaughter Eileen O’Sullivan and boarder Daniel O’Flaherty. Ambrose supposedly stayed in this house during his visit. (8)

Notification that Ambrose had been wounded in 1917 (Ambrose Haley Service Record)

Notification that Ambrose had been wounded in 1917 (Ambrose Haley Service Record)

Eventually recovered, Ambrose was finally able to rejoin his unit on 31st August 1918. However, the unfortunate young man’s front line service was to again prove brief. He reported sick on 27th September, apparently suffering from slight deafness, no doubt caused by the noise of the guns. On 29th September he was sent to the 1st Australian General Hospital in Rouen, before being shipped back to England aboard the Hospital Ship Essequibo on 2nd October. Ambrose finally ended up in the Graylingwell War Hospital in Chichester, where his condition continued to worsen. His parents, who had initially been informed that his condition was not serious, must have been shocked to receive a communication in Tasmania on 19th November that simply stated: ‘Now reported Gunner Ambrose Haley dangerously ill condition stationary further progress report expected.’ Ambrose’s brother Urban, who was serving as a Warrant Officer at Australian Imperial Force Headquarters on 130 Horseferry Road in London, likely tried to visit his stricken brother. It transpired that Ambrose’s body was ravaged with cancer; the disease had taken control of his pancreas lungs, spleen and ‘other organs.’ The 26-year-old Tasmanian succumbed to the illness on Christmas Day 1918. (9)

Notification of Ambrose's Death (Ambrose Haley Service Record)

Notification of Ambrose’s Death (Ambrose Haley Service Record)

So it was that five days later Ambrose’s brother Urban (who would soon receive the Meritorious Service Medal for devotion to duty during the period from September-November 1918) joined Australian Imperial Force representative Sergeant C.E. Hunkin in Holy Rosary cemetery, Midleton. The Haley’s Midleton relatives had offered their family grave as a final resting for their Tasmanian Digger cousin. One of those relatives– Timothy Christopher O’Sullivan– was of an age with Ambrose and probably attended the funeral. Less than three years later he would be the next person remembered at the plot, when he was killed while serving with the I.R.A. at the Clonmult Ambush on 20th February 1921, at the aged of 28. Military tragedy had not steered clear of the family for long. It is unlikely that Ambrose’s parents ever made it from Tasmania to Midleton to visit their son’s grave, but it must have given them some comfort to know that he rested with family. The story of their son, and that of the Lynches and O’Sullivans, is just one of thousands preserved in stone in the Midleton cemetery. (10)

The grave of Ambrose Augustine Haley in Midleton (Damian Shiels)

The grave of Ambrose Augustine Haley in Midleton (Damian Shiels)


Close up of inscription on the grave of Ambrose Augustine Haley in Midleton (Damian Shiels)

Close up of inscription on the grave of Ambrose Augustine Haley in Midleton (Damian Shiels)

(1) Irish Examiner, Haley Service Record; (2) Tasmanian Births, Ambrose Augustine Haley Service Record; (3) Ambrose Augustine Haley Service Record, John Marshall Haley Service Record, Urban Aloysius Joseph Haley Service Record; (4) Ambrose Augustine Haley Service Record; (5) Larkhill Camp, Ambrose Augustine Haley Service Record; (6) Ibid.; (7) Ibid., 3rd Australian Field Ambulance War Diary; (8) Ambrose Augustine Haley Service Record, Irish Examiner, 1911 Census of Ireland; (9) Ambrose Augustine Haley Service Record; (10) Ambrose Augustine Haley Service Record, Urban Aloysius Joseph Haley Service Record;

References

Irish Examiner 2nd January 1919. Southern Items

1414 John Marshall Haley Australian War Service Record

34423 Ambrose Augustine Haley Australian War Service Record

3441 Urban Aloysius Joseph Haley Australian War Service Record

3rd Australian Field Ambulance War Diary, October 1917

Diggers History: Larkhill Camp

Tasmanian Births in the District of Portland, 1892

1911 Census of Ireland, 51 William Street Midleton

Categories: 20th Century, World War One | Tags: , , , , , , , | 20 Comments

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